trial

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Judges hearing the appeal of Hissène Habré before the Extraordinary African Chamber (Photo: Twitter/@chambresafrica)
12 January 2017 by Thierry Cruvellier and IJT

This week the appeal of former Chadian president Hissène Habré started before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) in Dakar. Habré was convicted in May last year of war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture and sentenced to life in prison. The appeal has been mainly legal challenges from the defence and questions about the courts decisions on reparations. The sessions are being broadcast live but in the court in Dakar the public gallery has been largely empty and Habré himself has not attended the hearings.

From the IJT archives here's Thierry Cruvellier's 2016 story about how the Habré case can be a model as an alternative to international tribunals such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Court (ICC).

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Ratko Mladic and Radovan Karadzic together in an undated image (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
22 December 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg

The closing arguments in the case against former Bosnian Serb military commander General Ratko Mladic finished up last week. The 1992-95 war in Bosnia ended over twenty years ago and Mladic's is the last trial for the tribunal which has seen interest in its trials waning, is this case too little, too late or did the tribunal save the best for last?

Justice Tribune spoke to Iva Vukusic about the significance of the case and the closing arguments of the parties. Vukusic is former journalist who also worked in the prosecutions office of the Bosnian state court's war crimes chambers and is now a PhD candidate at Utrecht University where she focuses on paramilitarism during the 1990s wars in the former Yugoslavia.

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former coup leader general Amadou Haya Sanogo arrives for his trial in Mali on November 30, 2016 (Photo: Twitter/@Justice_Mali)
15 December 2016 by Abdoulaye Guindo in Mali

During December 2016, the Malian authorities put on trial former coup leader General Amadou Haya Sanogo along with 17 other military men for their roles in kidnapping and killing 21 elite Malian soldiers who had been accused of leading a counter-coup against Sanago and his followers.

Abdoulaye Guindo, a journalist with Malian daily online Proces-Verbal, has been covering justice efforts in Mali for many years. But this trial was different from any other he has covered.

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Wartime Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic on the day of his conviction by the ICTY (Photo; Flickr/ICTY)
26 May 2016 by Jesse Wieten in The Hague (The Netherlands)

The trial of former Bosnian Serb political leader Radovan Karadzic is one of the most important proceedings before the ICTY, he was the court's most wanted fugitive for over a decade and highest-ranking Bosnian Serb ever on trial for war crimes and genocide. Even though Karadzic liked to present himself as a lone defendant, acting against the ICTY prosecution machinery, he was closely advised and guided by attorney Peter Robinson. The US counsel reflects on the case that will live on in the legacy of tribunal because of Karadzic's central role in the 1992-95 Bosnian war but also for the marathon effort he made pleading his case as his own lawyer. 

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Thomas Kwoyelo (centre) and his lead counsel, Caleb Alaka, at the Internal Crimes Division (Photo: Samuel Egadu Okiror)
28 April 2016 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Gulu (Uganda)

Six years after the first proceedings were halted, Uganda’s International Crimes Division (ICD) will on Monday 2 May begin the controversial trial of Thomas 

Kwoyelo, former Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander, accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. But experts question whether justice will be served.

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Judge Yassmin Barrios presiding the Sepur Zarco trial in Guatemala (Photo: Twitter/@usembassyguate)
03 February 2016 by Louisa Reynolds, Guatemala City (Guatemala)

Guatemala this week started the landmark trial of two former military officers who face charges of sexual and domestic slavery and forced disappearances. This marks the first time – ever and anywhere – that a national court will hear charges of sexual slavery committed during an armed conflict.

 

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08 October 2014 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court (ICC) are struggling to maintain their case against Kenyan vice president William Ruto and his co-accused, radio broadcaster Joshua Sang. As the evidence continues to dribble away, the defence plans to ask for an acquittal halfway through the trial. Both Ruto and Sang are accused of crimes against humanity committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in 2007 and 2008.

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Radovan Karadzic at his initial appearance before the ICTY in July, 2008
08 October 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) last week demanded a life sentence for former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. He faces charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during the bloody 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

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19 November 2014 by Nathalie Magnien

After a 24-year campaign, victims and their families are finally face to face with their alleged torturers, following the start of the trial of 21 alleged accomplices of former Chadian president Hissène Habré in N’Djamena last week.

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19 November 2014 by Luciana Bertoia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

A landmark trial in Argentina sheds a first light on the role of doctors and other medical personnel in cases during the 1976-1983 military dictatorship where babies were snatched from imprisoned activists and handed illegally to other families to raise them.