genocide

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South African president Jacob Zuma meets Omar al-Bashir on a 2015 visit to Sudan (Photo: Flickr/GovernmentZA)
05 July 2017 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Judges at the International Criminal Court (ICC) rule on Thursday whether South Africa had the obligation to arrest the president of Sudan, Omar al-Bashir, during an official visit. What are the legal and political issues at stake?

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Women in front a the memorial in Potocari cemetary that lists the names of the Srebrenica dead (Photo: Flickr/RNW)
07 October 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg

After the supreme court ruled in 2013 in the Nuhanovic case [IJT- 173] that the Dutch state was liable for at least three deaths of Bosnian Muslims who had sought refuge on the UN compound in Srebrenica manned by Dutch troops after the fall of the enclave, there has been a constant battle between the state and representatives of the victims trying to expand the Dutch liability to include more victims.

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Mass grave west of Shingal town, Kurdistan, Iraq (Photo: Flickr/Seth Franzman)
21 September 2016 by Janet H. Anderson

Just days ago Yazidi Nadia Murad who survived an attack by the so-called Islamic State (IS also known as ISIS) on the Yazidi community of northern Iraq and Amal Clooney, her lawyer, spoke to the UN about the need for justice for the Yazidis, forced out of their ancient homelands around Mount Sinjar.

Murad – who has just been appointed the UN’s goodwill ambassador on human trafficking – described how her family were killed in massacres conducted by ISIS during 2014, how she and other Yazidi women suffered when captured and held by ISIS fighters and how more than 2,000 Yazidi women are still being held captive. Clooney called on the UN to support calls for a genocide prosecution against the perpetrators at the International Criminal Court. Evidence – mainly refugee statements – has been sent to The Hague by Murad’s own organization Yazda, supported by former ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo. These efforts are part of the “It's On U” campaign using interlocking strategies aimed at an ICC prosecution of ISIS for genocide.

Janet Anderson spoke to Joanna Frivet, British-based barrister, who has travelled to the region and refugee camps where Yazidis are now living, to gather evidence for a potential prosecution. 

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Nadia Murad Basee Taha, a Yazidi woman who escaped sexual enslavement by Islamic State, bows her head after telling her story during a UN Security Council meeting (Photo: Flickr/UN Photo/Amanda Voisard)
21 July 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

After a United Nations Inquiry commission found last month that the crimes of Islamic State (IS also known as ISIS) against the Yazidi minority in northern Iraq amounted to genocide the call for accountability and prosecution of the perpetrators increased. What are the options to see anyone in the dock for not only genocide but also the underlying war crimes and crimes against humanity the commission said have occurred? International Justice Tribune spoke to former US ambassador for war crimes Stephen Rapp [IJT-186] who plays a central role in advising all stakeholders inside and outside on how to move forward and find justice for crimes against the Yazidi.

 

 

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Kigali Genocide Memorial (Photo: Janet Anderson)
10 May 2016 by Janet H. Anderson Kigali (Rwanda)

Two Rwandans will go on trial today in Paris for genocide and crimes against humanity. The trial of Octavien Ngenzi and Tite Barahirwa - both former mayors from the south east of the country – is France’s second in a series of up to a potential twenty suspects, in connection with the 1994 genocide. Former spy chief Pascal Simbikangwa was convicted in March 2014 to 25 years in jail in the first ever judgment by a French court relating to the Rwandan genocide. But in October last year the French case against a notorious side-arm-carrying priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka was dismissed to widespread criticism.

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Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
24 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on Thursday convicted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of genocide for the 1995 Srebrenica massacre and nine other counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison for his role in the 44-month siege of Sarajevo, the establishment of a network of detention camps in Prijedor where non-Serbs were abused and tortured and taking UN personnel hostage and many other crimes.

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Post-conflict rubble in Gori, Georgia, on 25 August 2008 (Photo: Flickr/Chuck Simmins)
27 February 2016

In this month's IJT we ask if the ICC's probe into alleged war crimes in Georgia in 2008 risks being one-sided as the court could be dragged in to a new Cold War. Will prosecutor Fatou Bensouda's move out of Africa be able to escape accusations of bias after Russia has already announced it will not cooperate?

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Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
25 February 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has a busy month ahead. As it prepares to close its doors next year it will hand down verdicts in two of its last trials. The Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will hear a judgement in his historic case on 24 March, which could expand genocide in Bosnia beyond Srebrenica. A week later judges will hand down their ruling in the trial of firebrand Serb politician Vojislav Seselj, which has been shrouded in controversy. IJT asked Marko Milanovic, associate professor of law at the University of Nottingham and longtime ICTY observer, about what’s at stake in both cases.

 

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Witness appears before the ECCC in case 002/02 against on 13 January 2016 (Photo: Flickr/ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng)
10 February 2016 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Judges at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) continued this month hearing eyewitness testimony about how the Khmer Rouge targeted Cham Muslims and ethnic Vietnamese, including women and children. Case 002/02, part two of the case against former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan [IJT-176, IJT-179], tackles the question of whether the regime committed genocide as per the narrow legal definition.

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ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz
11 July 2015 by Serge Brammertz and Michelle Jarvis

In this opinion piece prosecutor Serge Brammertz of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Michelle Jarvis, the principal legal counsel in the office of the prosecutor, reflect on the Srebrenica massacre as a dramatic example of how gender influences the experiences of war victims. 

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