EAC

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Judges hearing the appeal of Hissène Habré before the Extraordinary African Chamber (Photo: Twitter/@chambresafrica)
12 January 2017 by Thierry Cruvellier and IJT

This week the appeal of former Chadian president Hissène Habré started before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) in Dakar. Habré was convicted in May last year of war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture and sentenced to life in prison. The appeal has been mainly legal challenges from the defence and questions about the courts decisions on reparations. The sessions are being broadcast live but in the court in Dakar the public gallery has been largely empty and Habré himself has not attended the hearings.

From the IJT archives here's Thierry Cruvellier's 2016 story about how the Habré case can be a model as an alternative to international tribunals such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Court (ICC).

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Demonstration of widows of victims of former Chadian dictator Hissène Habré in the Chadian capital N'Djamena in 2005 (Photo: Human Rights Watch)
15 June 2016 by Reed Brody (Op-ed contributor)

A special court in Senegal convicted Hissène Habré, the former president of Chad, for atrocity crimes on May 30, and sentenced him to life in prison[IJT-192]. It was the first time  that the courts of one country had prosecuted the former ruler of another for alleged human rights crimes. It was also the first time in a human rights trial that a former ruler was found to have personally committed rape.

Most important for the future, however, the verdict was the result of a 25-year campaign by Habré’s victims and their supporters. They improbably succeeded in creating the political conditions to bring Habré to justice in Africa, with the support of the African Union.

 

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Stephen Rapp speaking at a Coalition for the ICC event in 2013 (Photo: Flickr/CICC)
30 September 2015

IJT 186 is our first issue after the summer break and also the first in our new publishing scheme of a monthly digest of our feature articles which appeared on our site previously.

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16 September 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After grumbling from Chad that people there could not properly follow the proceedings of Hissène Habré, which resumed this month before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC), the trial of the ex-dictator was suddenly broadcast live on national television Tuesday.

Despite reported trouble with the audio-feed, this was the first time many victims in Chad – where 99 percent of the population lacks access to the internet and cannot follow the live-stream the EAC provides on its website – could see testimony in the case against their country’s former leader, accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture.

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Chadians demonstrate for justice in January, following a second suspension of the trial against Habré’s henchmen (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
24 March 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After a 26-year wait and a four-month trial that saw victims finally confront alleged criminal accomplices of former dictator Hissène Habré [IJT-170], a Chad court is expected to deliver its ruling on 25 March. Judges will decide the fate of the 21 accused, facing charges of torture, murder, illegal arrest and arbitrary detention.

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04 April 2014 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The third investigative mission of the Dakar-based African Extraordinary Chambers (EAC) took place in Chad from the 15th to the 28th of March. The team included four Senegalese investigative judges accompanied by two prosecutors.

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28 May 2014 by IJT

The African Extraordinary Chambers (EAC) will conduct a fourth and possibly their last investigative mission in Chad, from 24 May to 9 June. 

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25 June 2014 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

A fourth investigative mission to Chad in the Hissène Habré case before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) concluded on 9 June, with pressure continuing to mount on Chadian authorities to transfer two suspects to face trial in Senegal.

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09 July 2014 by Abdullahi Boru, Nairobi (Kenya)

After four years of discussions, the African Union (AU) has agreed the statute of the African Court of Justice and Human Rights – a merger of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Court of Justice. Heads of state adopted the protocol during a summit held in Malabo (Equatorial Guinea) on 26 June; but the long-expected dream of an African criminal court may take years to become reality and has already attracted many questions about its effectiveness.

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10 September 2014 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

Relations between the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) and Chad have further soured as the country was denied a request to be a civil party in the case against its ex-president, Hissène Habré, and N’Djamena still tarries over the transfer of suspects.

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