Dutchbat

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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
28 June 2017 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The Srebrenica massacre always seems to boil down to numbers when it gets to court. I have sat through many hours of discussions about the actual number of victims, whether that number was large enough to constitute a genocide, the precise times to pinpoint who knew what and when at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and later in the genocide case before the International Court of Justice (ICJ).

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015

IJT 185 is a free special issue to mark the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. The murder of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys is the only atrocity in post-WWII Europe that was officially labeled a genocide by two international courts, and it has helped shape international laws on genocide. For this issue, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) president Theodor Meron answers questions about handing over the court's remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president.

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Coffins of Srebrenica victims are kept inside barracks belonging to the former Dutchbat compound before an 11 July ceremonial burial across the road at the cemetery in Potocari (Photo: Flickr/ mikel_oibar)
07 July 2015 by Marco Gerritsen and Simon van der Sluijs

In this article, Marco Gerritsen and Simon van der Sluijs of law firm Van Diepen Van der Kroef Advocaten, leading counsel for the Mothers of Srebrenica, give an inside view on their clients' proceedings against the Dutch State.

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Dutchbat march on Veterans Day 2014 in The Hague (Photo: Flickr/faceme)
04 May 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

A district court in the Netherlands last week confirmed a 2013 decision by prosecutors not to charge former Dutchbat commander Thom Karremans and two subordinates for three deaths in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. The victims were among the nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims killed while under supposed protection by Dutch UN peacekeepers.

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Al Jadeed journalist Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial (Photo: Flickr/STLebanon)
04 May 2015

IJT 181 examines what two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon show about the main in absentia trial seeking to uncover who killed Lebanese ex-premier Rafik Hariri.

Other features:

  • Will Kenya’s restorative justice fund sideline truth commission findings?
  • Will new reparations body in Ivory Coast fulfill promise? 
  • Hopeful to move forward, Bosnian millennials try to unearth war skeletons

News briefs:

  • Netherlands court backs decision not to prosecute Dutchbat soldiers over Srebrenica deaths
  • ​Controversial Libyan Senussi trial to enter final phase
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11 July 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 13 July 1995, Rizo Mustafic, an electrician working at the UN compound in Potocari, near Srebrenica, was expelled from the camp by a Dutch officer. Not long after, he was killed. Today, members of his family, together with a former UN interpreter at the military base, Hasan Nuhanovic, are making a legal bid before a Dutch national court in The Hague to claim damages. Aware of the political and financial consequences such a precedent could have for the Dutch state, the court has examined witness testimony carefully. One 10 July, the plaintiffs announced their decision to go to trial.

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13 July 2010 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Relatives of three victims of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre last week filed a complaint with the Dutch prosecutor’s office charging three former United Nations peacekeepers with complicity in genocide, war crimes and murder.