Women, war and reflections on Srebrenica

11 July 2015 by Serge Brammertz and Michelle Jarvis

In this opinion piece prosecutor Serge Brammertz of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Michelle Jarvis, the principal legal counsel in the office of the prosecutor, reflect on the Srebrenica massacre as a dramatic example of how gender influences the experiences of war victims. 

ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz
Image caption: 
ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)

The issue of women and war has never been more prominent on the international agenda than today. Horrifying accounts of abducted Nigerian school-girls, hundreds of women and girls in ISIS slave markets and scores of women “disappeared” in Syria leave no room for doubt that war is no longer – if it ever was – confined to soldiers on the battlefield.

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