States must not treat ICC “as a dustbin for political has-beens,” says expert

17 December 2014 by Janet H. Anderson, New York (US)

In the run-up to the annual meeting of the International Criminal Court (ICC), held earlier this month in New York, a panel of legal experts presented recommendations for the court’s future. Tasked by a number of member states and funded by Switzerland, they critically reviewed the ICC’s last 12 years and, as lawyers who have worked in many international tribunals, suggested ways for the court to improve.

Image caption: 
ICC building in The Hague (Flickr/ICC-CPI)

In October, IJT used their findings, which were presented in a report, as a lens through which to examine the ICC prosecution’s latest strategic plan. Here IJT interviews the report’s main author, defence lawyer and academic Guénaël Mettraux. 

Why was this report needed?

Guénaël Mettraux (GM): We’ve reached the first decade of the ICC, and it’s a good time to make an evaluation of how it’s fared so far. Everyone, or mostly everyone, agrees that it has performed under the standards expected. A good place to start was to find the people, the time and the ideas to try to help the court, so that in 10 years it will be in better shape.

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