Serge Brammertz: vindicated

06 June 2011 by Lauren Comiteau

Serge Brammertz feels vindicated as he prepares for the trial of former Bosnian Serb general Ratko Mladic in The Hague. But he says it's too soon to know if Mladic will face trial alongside his former boss, Radovan Karadzic. Brammertz spoke to Lauren Comiteau in The Hague.

We have always said that the main hypothesis is that he is hiding in Serbia and that the key for his arrest is in Belgrade. At the end of the day this has proven to be the correct hypothesis. Now of course today we recognise the important work done by the Serbian authorities. It has taken very long, but we hope not too long, to have him arrested finally after 16 years, but of course it is a positive development.

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