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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
 

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the Holocaust, women conducted medical experiments and guarded concentration camps. During the Rwandan genocide, they managed roadblocks and burned buildings with people inside. Women have been involved in almost every type of mass violence, a recent Dutch study has found. Still, the number who are prosecuted and convicted is significantly lower than men.

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Ligature used to bind victims hands in Srebrenica, unearthed during an exhumation there. (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
19 May 2015 by Ella Sonja West, Chicago (US)

Two months ago, the Balkans were rocked by a story in The New York Times that the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) was set to deport 150 Bosnians who lied on their immigration applications about involvement in the 1992-1995 war. ICE policies, however, may in fact be more nuanced than suggested by the headlines. And yet they still face criticism for their one-sided approach to Balkan immigrants.

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A demonstration outside the Guatemalan embassy in Mexico against the overturned sentence of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt (Photo: Flickr/Amnistía Mexico)
18 May 2015 by Louisa Reynolds, Guatemala City (Guatemala)

After decades of slow justice, Colombian and Guatemalan victims of sexual crimes committed during their respective countries’ armed conflicts are fighting to get their cases heard. In late April, Colombian human rights organizations called on the International Criminal Court (ICC) to intervene and start prosecuting. Meanwhile, in Guatemala late last year, after decades of silence and neglect, victims of sexual violence achieved an important victory when a landmark sexual slavery trial opened.

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Chadians demonstrate for justice in January, following a second suspension of the trial against Habré’s henchmen (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
18 May 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After decades of appeals from victims, former Chadian dictator Hissène Habré will finally go on trial. On 20 July in Dakar, before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) criminal trial court, he will face charges of crimes against humanity, torture and war crimes committed in Chad between 1982 and 1990.

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Colombian & Guatemalan sexual violence survivors still fight to be heard in court, reports @ReynoldsLouisa for IJT. http://tinyurl.com/prr7g62 

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