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Wartime Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic on the day of his conviction by the ICTY (Photo; Flickr/ICTY)
26 May 2016 by Jesse Wieten in The Hague (The Netherlands)

The trial of former Bosnian Serb political leader Radovan Karadzic is one of the most important proceedings before the ICTY, he was the court's most wanted fugitive for over a decade and highest-ranking Bosnian Serb ever on trial for war crimes and genocide. Even though Karadzic liked to present himself as a lone defendant, acting against the ICTY prosecution machinery, he was closely advised and guided by attorney Peter Robinson. The US counsel reflects on the case that will live on in the legacy of tribunal because of Karadzic's central role in the 1992-95 Bosnian war but also for the marathon effort he made pleading his case as his own lawyer. 

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Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
24 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on Thursday convicted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of genocide for the 1995 Srebrenica massacre and nine other counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison for his role in the 44-month siege of Sarajevo, the establishment of a network of detention camps in Prijedor where non-Serbs were abused and tortured and taking UN personnel hostage and many other crimes.

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015

IJT 185 is a free special issue to mark the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. The murder of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys is the only atrocity in post-WWII Europe that was officially labeled a genocide by two international courts, and it has helped shape international laws on genocide. For this issue, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) president Theodor Meron answers questions about handing over the court's remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president.

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg and Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the lead-up to the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims, IJT spoke to the president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Judge Theodor Meron answered questions about the genocide and efforts to close the ICTY and hand over its remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president. 

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Photo exhibit used in ICTY Srebrenica cases of a single shoe left at Branjevo Military Farm (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
07 July 2015 by Heikelina Verrijn Stuart and IJT

For IJT’s special issue acknowledging the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, we are publishing an edited version of a November 2005 article [IJT-29] by international law expert Heikelina Verrijn Stuart. It illustrates how the ICTY was shaping the law of genocide a decade ago. 

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21 April 2010 by Linawati Sidarto

After months of delay, the genocide trial against former President Radovan Karadžić in the Hague last week started hearing the first testimonies by witnesses about atrocities committed during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. 

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13 April 2010 by -

After months of delay, the genocide trial against former President Radovan Karadžić in the Hague last week started hearing the first testimonies by witnesses about atrocities committed during the 1992-95 Bosnian war.

By Linawati Sidarto

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18 October 2011 by -

The “poor relation of the international courts” are the defence. So says Richard Harvey, standby counsel for Radovan Karadzic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).
He claims there is no “equality of arms”, as the prosecution has the advantage in the courtroom. For instance over calling witnesses and presenting evidence.

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29 February 2012 by -

Retired Bosnian Serb general Manojlo Milovanovic faces his former boss this week: supreme army commander Radovan Karadzic, accused of genocide. His testimony is a symbol of the evolution of witness protection at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY): the longer the tribunal goes on, the less it uses over-protective measures for witnesses.

By Radosa Milutinovic, The Hague

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01 April 2010 by -

The trial of Radovan Karadžić is scheduled to resume on 13 April with the start of the presentation of the prosecution’s evidence.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The order was made on the back of the appeals chamber’s dismissal of Karadžić’s appeal  to allow him to postpone his trial.

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