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Radio talk show in Gulu, Uganda, facilitated by the ICC in commemoration of International Justice Day in July 2011 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
21 October 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Lira (Uganda)

Ugandan war crimes’ victims are growing increasingly frustrated with what they see as too little or too late from the Trust Fund for Victims (TFV). They ask why the fund, which is part of the International Criminal Court (ICC) but operates independently, seems to be scaling back reparations while the court is expanding the charges in its first Ugandan case, against former LRA commander Dominic Ongwen.

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Niamba Privat shares images taken after a May 2011 attack at his Yopougon home during post-election violence in Ivory Coast (Photo: Christin Roby)
04 May 2015 by Christin Roby, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

Wounds, physical and psychological, heal slowly for many victims of the 2011 post-election crisis in Ivory Coast that killed over 3,000 residents and ended with former President Laurent Gbagbo’s ouster by Alassane Ouattara.

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Kenya's TJRC "had no political champions," says Mutuma Ruteere, director of the Centre for Human Rights and Policy Studies in Nairobi (Photo: Flickr/unisgeneva/UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré)
04 May 2015 by Abdullahi Boru, Nairobi (Kenya)

Earlier this year Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in his state of the union address not only apologized on behalf of the state for past human rights abuses, but also announced a three-year, 10 billion Kenyan-shilling (96 million-euro) “restorative justice” fund for victims of such atrocities. But critics say much is unclear about the plan and how it will co-exist with reparations processes and procedures envisaged by the now defunct Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC) [IJT-162].

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Al Jadeed journalist Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial (Photo: Flickr/STLebanon)
04 May 2015

IJT 181 examines what two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon show about the main in absentia trial seeking to uncover who killed Lebanese ex-premier Rafik Hariri.

Other features:

  • Will Kenya’s restorative justice fund sideline truth commission findings?
  • Will new reparations body in Ivory Coast fulfill promise? 
  • Hopeful to move forward, Bosnian millennials try to unearth war skeletons

News briefs:

  • Netherlands court backs decision not to prosecute Dutchbat soldiers over Srebrenica deaths
  • ​Controversial Libyan Senussi trial to enter final phase
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ICC's office of public counsel for victims at the Lubanga appeals hearing on 3 March 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
10 March 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In a landmark appeals ruling last week, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued guidelines on reparations to victims in the Lubanga case that are expected to lead the court in future cases.

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24 April 2012 by -

If it took 6 years to convict the Congolese rebel leader Thomas Lubanga, how long will it take the International Criminal Court (ICC) to decide on reparations for the victims?

by Josephine Uwineza, Brussels

[related-articles]The ICC has made its mark on international justice by introducing victims’ participation into trials.
The Lubanga trial continues to be a trail blazer for the Rome Statute, as the court’s first conviction has now led to the first reparations proceedings.

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24 February 2010 by -

The Liberian Senate has for the second time rejected six individuals nominated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to serve as commissioners on the Independent National Human Rights Commission of Liberia (INHCR).

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The creation of the INHCR was mandated in 2005 to promote and protect human rights in post-conflict Liberia, and oversee implementation of the country’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) final report. The TRC catalogued human rights abuses committed during Liberia’s two decades of conflict.

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23 July 2007 by -

On July 13, the High Military Court in Kinshasa sentenced the Democratic Republic of Congo to pay reparations ranging from USD 500 to USD 25,000 to victims of war crimes committed by the Armed Forces of Congo in Ankoro, northern Katanga, in November 2002 [IJT-16]. The Congolese human rights organization ASADHO says it is "partially satisfied with this decision, in that it has increased the modest sums" accorded by the Katanga Military Court on December 20, 2004.

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14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

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People wait in line to see the opening statements of Case 002 at the ECCC on 23 November 2011. Copyright Flickr/krtribunal
13 January 2015 by Julia Wallace and Kuch Naren, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Chum Mey and Bou Meng spend a large part of the day, every day, sitting across from each other. The two elderly Cambodian men are among only a handful who survived a stint in the hellish S-21 prison, where over 12,000 people were jailed, tortured and sent to their deaths in a killing field outside Phnom Penh.

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