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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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09 October 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On September 27, sixty-one year old Momcilo Krajisnik, president of the Assembly of Bosnian Serbs from 1991-1995, was sentenced to 27 years in prison by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for crimes against humanity. He was acquitted on the charge of genocide. Would the judges have ruled differently if his indictment had covered the Srebrenica massacre - a crime that has led to the only two genocide convictions before the ICTY?

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05 March 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Some say that this has been the most difficult case in the history of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), a 60-year old UN court that rules on disputes between States, such as border issues or coastal fishing zones. On February 26, the ICJ finally concluded the genocide case of Bosnia-Herzegovina against Serbia, which had been running for almost 14 years.

Srebrenica massacre