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Slobodan Praljak (centre) at his first sentencing hearing in 2013 (photo: Flickr/ICTY)
30 November 2017 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

After  the initial shock has faded  Justice Tribune editor Stephanie van den Berg, wonders if Slobodan Praljak's suicide in the courtroom of the Yugoslav tribunal is not in many ways a fitting ending for the court which leaves an uneasy legacy.

It was supposed to be a predictable appeals verdict in the case of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia against six Bosnian Croat officials. Important. But not one of the tribunal’s highest profile cases. And made special to a degree because it was the last verdict the ICTY would ever pronounce.

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ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
13 November 2017 by Boro Kontic

On the eve of the verdict in the case of Bosnian Serb military commander Ratko Mladic ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz has given a lengthy interview to Serbian and Bosnian media. Here is shortened version of the interview conducted by Boro Kontic which has appeared in Novi magazine and Oslobodjenje newspaper. 

 

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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
28 June 2017 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The Srebrenica massacre always seems to boil down to numbers when it gets to court. I have sat through many hours of discussions about the actual number of victims, whether that number was large enough to constitute a genocide, the precise times to pinpoint who knew what and when at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and later in the genocide case before the International Court of Justice (ICJ).

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Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj (Photo: Twitter/@seselj_vojislav)
31 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj was acquitted Thursday of all nine charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes and is now a free man presiding judge Jean-Claude Antonetti of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ruled. Seselj, already provisionally released on health grounds, was not present in court.

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015

IJT 185 is a free special issue to mark the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. The murder of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys is the only atrocity in post-WWII Europe that was officially labeled a genocide by two international courts, and it has helped shape international laws on genocide. For this issue, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) president Theodor Meron answers questions about handing over the court's remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president.

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg and Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the lead-up to the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims, IJT spoke to the president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Judge Theodor Meron answered questions about the genocide and efforts to close the ICTY and hand over its remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president. 

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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
23 March 2015 by Joost van Egmond, Belgrade (Serbia)

In a police action hailed as a major breakthrough, Serbia arrested last week eight suspects of mass killings after the fall of the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995. If they face court, it will be the biggest trial for war crimes in Serbia so far.

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10 March 2010 by -

Radovan Karadzic opened his defence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on March 1st – four months later than scheduled – only to have the trial postponed once again two days later.

By Hermione Gee

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10 March 2010 by -

Former Bosnian president Ejup Ganic will remain in jail in London while his application for bail is considered. Ganic was arrested at Heathrow Airport on March 1st at the request of Serbia, where he is wanted on war crimes charges.

A Muslim member of Bosnia’s presidency during the 1992-1995 war and former president of the Muslim-Croat Federation of Bosnia and Hercegovina, Ganic is being held in Wandsworth prison in south London.

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07 April 2010 by -

Some 10,000 people are still considered missing almost 15 years after the end of the war in Bosnia, the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) said this week.

ICRC would continue “to work towards shedding a light over the fate of all missing persons” from the 1992-95 conflict, said Henry Fournier, ICRC head for Bosnia.

“There are still some 10,000 missing whose fate remains unknown and their names are still on the ICRC lists” of missing persons, the ICRC statement said.

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