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26 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

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24 February 2010 by Sebastian Gottlieb & Vessela Evrova

Austria came under fire earlier this month for refusing asylum to a Serbian man who turned over the infamous “Scorpion tape” to international prosecutors in The Hague.

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19 July 2011 by -

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Monday declined to prosecute for contempt of court a former detention unit commander suspected of leaking private information about Serb strongman Slobodan Milosevic.

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13 April 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

Geoffrey Nice, British barrister, is a familiar face in the international legal world. Flamboyant, eloquent and outspoken, he became a well-known courtroom figure as lead prosecutor in the trial of the late Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic at the ICTY. Since then, Nice has represented victims before the ICC and is now representing the government of Kenya, in relation to the ‘Ocampo 6’.

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03 June 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

There were cries of emotion from Srebrenica survivors in the public gallery when former Bosnian Serb General Ratko Mladic did not enter a plea to charges he called "monstrous" and "obnoxious".

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28 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Few people expected Radovan Karadzic to show up to the start of his trial on Monday. He had already announced his intention not to attend a few days earlier in a written submission to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The former President of the Serb Republic in Bosnia stayed away to protest the fact that he hadn't been given more time to prepare his case. The pre-trial and appeals chambers rejected his request for a 10-month postponement earlier this month.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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10 October 2005 by Adele Waugaman

Most people hear the words "war crime" and think of the Nuremberg Trials or Slobodan Milosevic's trial, but that may soon change. Up till now, British soldiers have never been charged under this highly symbolic label. However, in July the British Attorney-General reversed this trend by announcing that three soldiers were being charged with "war crimes under the ICC Act [of] 2001". That announcement made Britain the first member of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to charge its own citizens under such law.

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19 December 2005 by Franck Petit

Interview with Claude Jorda, judge at the International Criminal Court

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