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21 January 2007 by our correspondent in Arusha

Two years before the official end of its mandate, one of the priori-ties of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is to settle all the cases. On December 14, Joseph Nzabirinda took advantage of this favorable context and signed a mini-mum agreement concerning his guilt in the 1994 genocide. The prosecutor dropped the main charges against this former youth leader in exchange for Nzabirinda’s acknowledgement that he was an “approving spectator” of the massacre of Tutsis. On January 17, the judges will decide if they agree with the suggested sentence of 5 to 8 years in prison.

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07 November 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

On May 12, 2005, the President of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) discreetly handed down two decisions that illustrate an important difference between the UN tribunal in Arusha and The Hague-based tribunal that is responsible for trying cases of crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia. At the beginning of December 2004 the first motions for early release from persons convicted by the ICTR were brought before Judge Erik Mose. The two motions were filed by men who had pleaded guilty and cooperated with the prosecutor's office on an ongoing basis as informants or witnesses. Both motions were denied.

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20 December 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

At the beginning of the New Year, if the judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) stick to the terms of the agreement between the defence and the prosecutor, Vincent Rutaganira can consider himself a lucky man. On 8 December, the former district councillor of a small town in western Rwanda not only became the fourth Rwandan to plead guilty before a UN court. He will also be distinguished by the unprecedented conditions in which the prosecutor accepted his confession. 

Vincent Rutaganira