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21 June 2004 by -

The Argentinean Secretary of State for human rights, Eduardo Luis Duhalde, announced on 9 June the creation of a special search unit charged with finding the children who disappeared during the military dictatorship of Jorge Videla (1976-1983).

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11 April 2008 by Santiago O’Donnell

Thirty years after the start of its last and most bloody dictatorship, Argentina is debating forms of compensation for its victims. Over the last few weeks, Congress has been the scene of discussions over a new law to compensate political exiles for losses incurred as a result of their having to leave the country. The outcome of this legal, ethical and political debate is difficult to predict, but whatever the conclusion, it will set an important precedent for other Latin American countries.

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22 January 2007 by -

One by one, Latin American heads of state from the 70s are falling into the hands of justice. Argentina's most infamous dictator, Jorge Videla, risks loosing his presidential pardon [IJT-52]. Meanwhile on January 11, an Argentine court issued an international arrest warrant against another one of the country's former leaders, Isabel Peron, who was president from 1974-1976 and is currently living in Spain. The investigation that implicates Peron involves the 1976 disappearance of leftist activist Hector Fagetti Gallego.

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11 September 2006 by -

On September 5, Argentine judge Oyarbide overturned a presidential pardon granted in 1990 to former military junta leader Jorge Videla. With the start of trials of former perpetrators of crimes under the dictatorship at the end of June, after the amnesty laws were struck down [IJT-50], those who had received a pardon under former president Menem are now seeing these protections declared anti-constitutional by the Argentine courts. According to judge Oyarbide, presidential pardons do not apply to crimes against humanity.

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