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LRA child memorial (Photo: Flickr/Josh Zakary)
21 February 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

Uganda's decision to support the transfer of Dominic Ongwen [IJT-174] to the International Criminal Court (ICC), instead of trying the notorious Lord's Resistance Army commander at home, casts a shadow on the county's ability to hold domestic war crimes trials.

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03 March 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 84

Table of content:

  • International Criminal Court: Uganda: justice without the ICC
  • Truth Commission in Liberia: Outside the capital, the TRC draws no crowds
  • Trials in Argentina: Suspicious deaths in Argentina
  • Khmer Rouge trials in Cambodia: Duch, return to the scenes of the crime

Click here to download the IJT, No. 84

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11 July 2011 by -

Uganda on Monday opened its first war crimes trial against a commander of the Lord's Resistance Army rebels accused of brutal civilian killings during a 20-year war in the north of the country.

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19 July 2004 by -

Henceforth, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and northern Uganda will be the first cases to be studied by the International Criminal Court (ICC). On 6 July, the Court announced that the both cases have been placed under the authority of the pre-trial chambers. The main armed group the Court will be probing in Uganda is the Lord\'s Resistance Army (LRA). Recently, the rebel movement suffered a setback with the capture, announced by Kampala on 13 July, of one of its main leaders, the seventy-year-old Kenneth Banya.

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05 April 2004 by -

As the precedents set by the ad hoc tribunals for Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda have shown the first steps taken by the International Criminal Court (ICC) will determine its credibility. After announcing its first «first case» (Ituri, in the Democratic Republic of Congo), the prosecutor\'s office decided to launch another investigation into the Lord\'s Resistance Army (LRA). The LRA was created in northern Uganda in 1988 from a sect founded by Alice «Lakwena» Auma, who now lives peacefully in a Kenyan refugee camp.

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25 April 2005 by -

In an official photograph taken in The Hague on 16 April, the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor is surrounded by 24 community leaders from northern Uganda who had come to ask him to suspend his investigations in their country. The balance of power was clear. "As soon as there is a solution to end the violence, and if the prosecution is not serving the interest of justice, then my duty is to stop the investigation and prosecution," Luis Moreno Ocampo told AFP after the meeting.

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03 March 2008 by -

On February 19, the Ugandan government and rebel Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) signed an agreement to deal with crimes committed in northern Uganda over the past 22 years, reports AP. The parties then signed a permanent cease-fire on February 23. Under the agreement, the most serious crimes will be tried before a special chamber within the High Court, while the majority of the crimes will be resolved before traditional courts. The agreement puts the International Criminal Court (ICC) in a precarious position.

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22 May 2006 by -

The strategic political-legal game between President Yoweri Museveni and the International Criminal Court (ICC) has resumed. On May 15, the independent Ugandan newspaper "The Monitor" revealed that Joseph Kony, head of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) who was indicted by the ICC along with four of his lieutenants, offered to enter into peace talks with Museveni. The paper also reported that Kony met with South-Sudanese Vice President Riek Machar last week in South Sudan allegedly to request asylum.

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26 June 2006 by -

"If the ICC came out to say that they would give the peace process a chance before the legal process is done, then we would resolve the conflict in the region," South Sudan Vice President Riek Machar told Reuters on June 20. Machar is mediating the peace negotiations between Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) that were prepared last week in Juba. The same week on the other side of the border, the ICC was holding informational meetings in Lira in the north of Uganda, where the LRA attacked the local population in November 2003 and February 2004.

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