article
06 July 2011 by Bram Posthumus

Liberia’s reconstruction is going full steam ahead – but the people appear to be left behind. 

article
24 March 2010 by Bram Posthumus

War ended in Liberia almost seven years ago. It has left scars in the land and the people. The country is slowly recovering and questions regarding justice and impunity are being addressed – but not to everyone’s satisfaction.

article
24 March 2010 by -

The Solomon Islands Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) started public hearings into ethnic conflict that took place between 1998 and 2003. 100 people were killed and more than 20,000 had to flee their homes after violence broke out between rival ethnic groups from the islands of Guadalcanal and Malaita.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

article
24 March 2010 by -

The 102nd edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 102 (PDF file)

Subscribe to the International Justice Tribune

IJT 102 contents: 

article
26 September 2011 by Mariângela Guimarães

When I first watched ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian black comedy, at the cinema in Brazil, years after it was originally released, I was still a teenager. I remember finding it funny that black dots popped up on the screen to cover up sexual acts and parts of the body that we weren’t supposed to see. This was at the end of the 1970s and Brazil was under a military dictatorship that did things much worse than censoring film scenes. Every time I mention something from those years, like that experience at the movies, I notice that many people, and even younger Brazilians, seem to forget that the country was once ruled by a repressive regime.

article
10 March 2010 by Elles van Gelder

South African president Jacob Zuma must consult with victims before issuing any pardons for prisoners convicted of politically motivated crimes during the apartheid era. That’s according to a ruling by the country’s constitutional court.

article
24 March 2010 by Don Kirk

South Korea’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), founded in 2005 as an independent agency with a broad mandate to cover a century of abuse, faces dissolution by the country’s conservative government. The TRC is likely to last another few months wrapping up investigations and then fade away, a relic of the decade of liberal leadership that began with the inauguration of President Kim Dae-jung in February 1998.

article
03 March 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 84

Table of content:

  • International Criminal Court: Uganda: justice without the ICC
  • Truth Commission in Liberia: Outside the capital, the TRC draws no crowds
  • Trials in Argentina: Suspicious deaths in Argentina
  • Khmer Rouge trials in Cambodia: Duch, return to the scenes of the crime

Click here to download the IJT, No. 84

article
17 March 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 85

Table of content:

article
12 September 2011 by -

The head of the Ivory Coast's newly formed truth and reconciliation panel visited the diaspora in Senegal on Sunday to explain his mission to reunite the country torn apart by post-poll violence.

"We need to talk ... we need to admit we have turned a dark page," Charles Konan Banny, a former Ivorian prime minister, told his country's nationals in Dakar.

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