thomas lubanga

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07 January 2010 by Hélène Michaud

The trial of ex-Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo resumed last week at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. The founder and former leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots was a key player in the Ituri conflict and stands accused of using child soldiers.

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23 December 2009 by Hélène Michaud

It might seem like just another village meeting, but the presence of armed police at the local parish hall suggests something serious is going on.

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31 August 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Did Thomas Lubanga Dyilo systematically recruit children under the age of 15 as soldiers or did prosecutors recruit children to lie so that the former Congolese rebel leader will be convicted? That's the question three judges will deliberate on in the coming months. They will hand down the International Criminal Court’s first judgement.

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23 January 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

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20 November 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

Nothing could distinguish the justice handed down for former tyrant Saddam Hussein in war-torn Baghdad more than that unfolding in the comforts of The Hague against modest Congolese militiaman Thomas Lubanga. Nothing could also be more different in the unanimous criticisms of the microcosm that is international justice, in how they deal with the trial of Saddam, and their leniency towards the way the International Criminal Court (ICC) works. Admittedly, Saddam's trial was a failure in many respects.

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25 September 2006 by Franck Petit

On September 28, the judges of the International Criminal Court (ICC) were to hear prosecution and defense arguments before ruling on the opening of the Lubanga trial. This hearing was postponed for the second time. Back in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), many are at a loss as to how the prosecutor could produce such feeble results after two years of investigation. Already disappointed that the most senior officials are not being prosecuted, the Congolese are now frustrated to see only one defendant - Thomas Lubanga - charged with only one crime, the enlistment of child soldiers.

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25 September 2006 by Franck Petit

Paradox? On March 3, 2004 the president of the Democratic Republic of Congo deferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) because "the Congolese authorities are unfortunately not in a position to investigate the crimes" under the Rome Statute. Today, the world court is the one that has produced mediocre results while the Congolese courts have been handing down rulings in a series of trials for some of the most serious crimes.

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04 December 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Franck Petit

Three years after it began operating, the International Criminal Court (ICC) now employs 650 people, has ongoing investigations in three African countries, its first suspect in custody and is playing a key role in the Uganda peace negotiations. "Is the ICC still having teething problems?" wondered Professor Antonio Cassesse a few months ago in the Journal of International Criminal Justice. The States Parties to the ICC seem to be saying no, as overall, they are satisfied with the court's initial results. On December 1 in The Hague, they allocated almost 89 million euros to the court for its 2007 budget - a 10% increase over last year.

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22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

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18 February 2008 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

"It is the first time that a free ex-militia leader in Ituri has been handed over to the International Criminal Court (ICC)", said the Office of the Prosecutor after Mathieu Ngudjolo was arrested on February 6 in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Ngudjolo, the former head of the Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI), led a Lendu militia opposed to Thomas Lubanga's primarily Hema Union of Congolese Patriots. Lubanga and Germain Katanga, commander of the Congolese Patriotic Resistance Forces (FRPI) which was allied with the FNI, were already in custody in the DRC before being transferred to The Hague.

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