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13 March 2012 by -

Interview with Jason Stearns, author of Dancing in the Glory of Monsters, a history of the Congo wars of 1996-2003

(This article is an excerpt from our "Special Lubanga" issue, to be published on March 14 in the International Justice Tribune)

by Thierry Cruvellier*

Why investigations in Ituri and why Lubanga?

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07 January 2010 by Hélène Michaud

The trial of ex-Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo resumed last week at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. The founder and former leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots was a key player in the Ituri conflict and stands accused of using child soldiers.

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23 December 2009 by -

The 96th edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

 

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 96 (PDF file)

Subscribe to the International Justice Tribune

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31 August 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Did Thomas Lubanga Dyilo systematically recruit children under the age of 15 as soldiers or did prosecutors recruit children to lie so that the former Congolese rebel leader will be convicted? That's the question three judges will deliberate on in the coming months. They will hand down the International Criminal Court’s first judgement.

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23 December 2009 by Hélène Michaud

It might seem like just another village meeting, but the presence of armed police at the local parish hall suggests something serious is going on.

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23 January 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.

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22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

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18 February 2008 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

"It is the first time that a free ex-militia leader in Ituri has been handed over to the International Criminal Court (ICC)", said the Office of the Prosecutor after Mathieu Ngudjolo was arrested on February 6 in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Ngudjolo, the former head of the Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI), led a Lendu militia opposed to Thomas Lubanga's primarily Hema Union of Congolese Patriots. Lubanga and Germain Katanga, commander of the Congolese Patriotic Resistance Forces (FRPI) which was allied with the FNI, were already in custody in the DRC before being transferred to The Hague.

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25 September 2006 by Franck Petit

Paradox? On March 3, 2004 the president of the Democratic Republic of Congo deferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) because "the Congolese authorities are unfortunately not in a position to investigate the crimes" under the Rome Statute. Today, the world court is the one that has produced mediocre results while the Congolese courts have been handing down rulings in a series of trials for some of the most serious crimes.

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