article
16 February 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

His pen and notepad were already neatly packed, ready to leave the courtroom. But the judges ordered him to sit down, and two guards saw to it that the once-feared Charles Taylor witnessed the final stages of his trial for war crimes. But after the morning coffee break, the former Liberian president didn’t show up and decided to stay away for the rest of the week.

article
03 March 2008 by Thierry Cruvellier

On February 22, the Appeals Chamber in the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) issued its first judgment, confirming the sentence of three important leaders of the former military junta of the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council (AFRC) for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed between 1997 and 2000. The judges also added a new crime: forced marriages. Most importantly, they found that Alex Tamba Brima, Brima Bazzy Kamara and Santigie Borbor Kanu were part of a joint criminal enterprise, a decisive finding for the Taylor trial.

article
09 July 2007 by Gibson W. Jerue

If you listen to the song publicizing the Truth and Reconciliation Committee (TRC) that plays in the Liberian national media, it would seem the Commission is proceeding at a steady clip. Sadly, this is a less than accurate reflection of reality. At The Hague, former president Charles Taylor's trial has been adjourned. Meanwhile, the TRC has been unable to set an opening date for its public hearings in Monrovia. With little success, its nine commissioners are attempting to convince Liberians and backers that they are ready and able to make the TRC work.

article
21 January 2008 by Gibson W. Jerue

The day after the opening of the Taylor trial at The Hague, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has begun its public hearings in Monrovia. A first group of victims of the civil wars that devastated Liberia from 1989 to 2003, in which Charles Taylor played a central role, testified of the atrocities committed by all factions. 

article
04 June 2007 by Sylvain Savolainen

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's trial will open before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) on June 4. The Court has been relocated to the Hague [IJT-44] to try the case, which will be both its most important trial and its last. The Special Court, which was created in 2002, was expected to last just three years. In the end, it will have taken eight years to try nine individuals. And the jury is still out as to whether the Court will live up to expectations.

article
24 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

Three weeks after the Special Court for Sierra Leone requested that former Liberian president Charles Taylor be tried in The Hague, Taylor's transfer is still facing several obstacles. The guarantees required by the Netherlands are not in place; Taylor's lawyer is objecting, while Sierra Leoneans are divided over the issue and some members of the Dutch parliament are opposed to the transfer. Robin Vincent, who set up and led the Special Court's administration in Freetown from July 2002 to September 2005, analyzes some of the financial and strategic consequences of transferring the trial to a courtroom rented from the International Criminal Court (ICC).

article
26 June 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Less than three months after being placed in detention in Freetown, former Liberian president Charles Taylor was transported to The Hague on June 20, where he will be tried before a Special Court for Sierra Leone to be relocated in the premises of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Thus the Sierra Leonean "model" of rendering international justice in country has been shelved, while the Netherlands is trying to share the burden of being the world center of international justice.

article
10 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

This week the UN Security Council may ask the Netherlands to host the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established four years ago in Freetown, so that it can try its most important defendant, former Liberian president Charles Taylor, who has been incarcerated since March 29. Officially, security is the reason cited for this relocation, which would bring an end to the " Sierra Leonean model. " More than likely though, it is the result of a political agreement.

issue
04 June 2007

Taylor, last chance for the Sierra Leone model

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor's trial will open before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) on June 4. The Court has been relocated to the Hague to try the case, which will be both its most important trial and its last. The Special Court, which was created in 2002, was expected to last just three years. In the end, it will have taken eight years to try nine individuals. And the jury is still out as to whether the Court will live up to expectations.

Brazil: reliable, but far from dynamic

Brazil played an active part in the creation of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Yet the Latin American giant has mostly stayed on the sidelines when it comes to international criminal justice. This is because, for several years now, its diplomatic activity has focused on gaining a permanent seat at the United Nations Security Council. At the same time, Brazilian courts have been slow to act when it comes to judging human rights violations committed under the prior military regime.

Editorial:
Butare, a trial out of bounds at the ICTR

Brief news:
• Special Tribunal for Lebanon created
• ICTY: General Tolimir arrested
• Bosnia and Herzegovina
• Stankovic's escape
• Central African Republic: ICC's fourth investigation

 

 

Taylor trial