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05 July 2004 by -

The 1 July hearing to examine the legal challenge to Charles Taylor\'s exile, filed by two Nigerians, ended with a postponement to 13 July, reports the Nigerian newspaper The Guardian. The presidency and the attorney general's office have contested the legal basis of the proceedings, saying that the court does not have jurisdiction to hear the case. For their part, the local authorities have decided that it is not within their power to issue a court summons to the former Liberian president in Nigeria.

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06 September 2004 by -

Two Nigerian businessmen, victims of amputations in Sierra Leone in 1999, have won their first victory in the battle to force Nigeria to extradite the former president of Liberia Charles Taylor to Sierra Leone to face prosecution by the Special Court. The Nigerian High Federal Court ruled on 12 July that they can challenge the legality of Charles Taylor's asylum in their country, granted in August 2003.

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27 November 2003 by -

Sam Hinga-Norman was arrested by the Special Court for Sierra Leone, on 10 March 2003. He was then Minister of Internal Affairs and National Security. In 1994, he first organised traditional hunters, the Kamajors, into self-defence before being, from 1997 to 2002, the national co-ordinator of the Civil Defence Forces (CDF), the main armed group fighting in support of the government of President Kabbah, who was democratically elected in 1996. Hinga Norman's indictment for crimes against humanity and war crimes sparked heated debates in Sierra Leone.

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21 June 2004 by -

The exile granted to Charles Taylor ten months ago by the Abuja authorities is not proving very popular. Between 1990 and 2000, Nigeria lost hundreds of men in the civil wars in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Responsibility for this is mainly attributed to the former Liberian president. On 14 June, two Nigerian victims of the Sierra Leone rebellion in 1999 illustrated the resentment felt over the losses by lodging a complaint against Taylor. In it, they contest the exile granted to the former dictator and call for him to be extradited to the Special Court in Freetown.

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07 June 2004 by -

On 31 May, the Appeals Chamber of the Sierra Leone tribunal ruled that it has jurisdiction to try the former President of Liberia Charles Taylor. The defence had argued that the court had no legal right to try Taylor as he was protected by diplomatic immunity as a head of state at the time of his indictment. Immediately after the decision, in which the court reaffirmed its international status, prosecutor David Crane called on the Nigerian government to hand the defendant over to the court.

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15 March 2004 by -

The official opening ceremony of the Special Court for Sierra Leone on 10 March was expected to be a mostly symbolic affair. But on 27 February, counsel for Issa Sesay, who succeeded Foday Sankoh in 2000 as the head of the rebel movement, the Revolutionary United Front (RUF), filed a motion that somewhat disrupted the day's agenda. It called for the court president Geoffrey Robertson to resign or be disqualified on the basis of extracts from a book written by the QC.

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20 September 2004 by our correspondent

Human Rights Watch (HRW), in its report published on 8 September, urges the Special Court for Sierra Leone not to limit its prosecution to the thirteen people it has indicted so far (of who only nine are in custody).

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04 October 2004 by -

How to step up pressure on Nigeria while providing it with an honourable means of handing over the former Liberian leader to the Sierra Leone Special Court? Recent diplomatic moves indicate that the main protagonists in the Charles Taylor affair have set a new agenda for his transfer. A year after Abuja granted Charles Taylor political asylum as part of a US and UN-backed peace settlement, there are signs of a general move to review the decision.

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21 November 2005 by -

In a unanimously adopted resolution on November 11, the UN Security Council voted to add to the mandate of the UN mission in Liberia the "apprehension, detention and transfer [of Charles Taylor] to the Special Court of Sierra Leone, in the event of his return to Liberia." The former Liberian president has been living in exile in Nigeria since August 2003 and has been charged with crimes against humanity by the Freetown court.

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07 November 2005 by -

On November 1, a federal court in Abuja ruled in favor of a suit brought by two Nigerian victims of amputations by members of the United Revolutionary Front, the Sierra Leonean rebellion that the then president of Liberia, Charles Taylor, supported for ten years. The plaintiffs object to the fact that the Nigerian government has granted Taylor asylum since 2003. The Nigerian court ruled that their complaint was justified. Taylor is wanted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone, which wants to try him for crimes against humanity.

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