Taylor

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20 September 2004 by our correspondent

Human Rights Watch (HRW), in its report published on 8 September, urges the Special Court for Sierra Leone not to limit its prosecution to the thirteen people it has indicted so far (of who only nine are in custody).

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18 October 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

For those who have followed the tribulations of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for almost three years, its official report, which was published on 5 October, constitutes a small miracle. No one could have predicted such a logically structured, abundantly detailed, and well-written report two years ago when the Commission almost dissolved itself through sheer negligence. Even a year ago when the report was first due out, hopes for a turnaround were not high.

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10 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

This week the UN Security Council may ask the Netherlands to host the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established four years ago in Freetown, so that it can try its most important defendant, former Liberian president Charles Taylor, who has been incarcerated since March 29. Officially, security is the reason cited for this relocation, which would bring an end to the " Sierra Leonean model. " More than likely though, it is the result of a political agreement.

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26 June 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Less than three months after being placed in detention in Freetown, former Liberian president Charles Taylor was transported to The Hague on June 20, where he will be tried before a Special Court for Sierra Leone to be relocated in the premises of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Thus the Sierra Leonean "model" of rendering international justice in country has been shelved, while the Netherlands is trying to share the burden of being the world center of international justice.

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24 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

Three weeks after the Special Court for Sierra Leone requested that former Liberian president Charles Taylor be tried in The Hague, Taylor's transfer is still facing several obstacles. The guarantees required by the Netherlands are not in place; Taylor's lawyer is objecting, while Sierra Leoneans are divided over the issue and some members of the Dutch parliament are opposed to the transfer. Robin Vincent, who set up and led the Special Court's administration in Freetown from July 2002 to September 2005, analyzes some of the financial and strategic consequences of transferring the trial to a courtroom rented from the International Criminal Court (ICC).