STL

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Lady justice, Williamson county court house (Photo: Flickr/Jack)
06 January 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The range of justice processes across the world is continuing to become more multi-faceted each year – and 2016 is no exception. But while providing fodder for the burgeoning groups of academics considering the significance and influence of the wide variety of courts, there is no sense that the world has settled on an ideal format with which to hold perpetrators of violence during conflicts to account. The plurality is the grist to IJT’s mill. For the year ahead, there are significant cases – and institutions – coming to an end, while other sagas continue.

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19 January 2011 by Daisy Mohr

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon’s prosecutor Daniel Bellemare filed his first indictment this week amidst a political crisis in the country. Factions are at loggerheads about the existence of the tribunal, which seeks to investigate the 2005 assassination of former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri. 

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Al Jadeed journalist Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial (Photo: Flickr/STLebanon)
04 May 2015

IJT 181 examines what two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon show about the main in absentia trial seeking to uncover who killed Lebanese ex-premier Rafik Hariri.

Other features:

  • Will Kenya’s restorative justice fund sideline truth commission findings?
  • Will new reparations body in Ivory Coast fulfill promise? 
  • Hopeful to move forward, Bosnian millennials try to unearth war skeletons

News briefs:

  • Netherlands court backs decision not to prosecute Dutchbat soldiers over Srebrenica deaths
  • ​Controversial Libyan Senussi trial to enter final phase
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Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial
04 May 2015 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) last month began hearing one of two contempt cases. Each charges a Lebanese media company [IJT-167] and a senior journalist with having “knowingly and wilfully interfered with the administration of justice” by publicizing information about purported confidential witnesses in the main Ayyash et al. case.

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Images in Beirut commemorating Rafik Hariri, who died ten years ago (Photo: Ana Uzelac)
09 March 2015 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

This month the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) embarked on a newly reissued three-year mandate. Compared to other international courts, its principal task remains narrow: to try those accused of carrying out the 14 February 2005 assassination of ex-prime minister Rafik Hariri and 21 others in downtown Beirut. But since the Ayyash et al. trial opened in January 2014, expectations of what it might accomplish have soared beyond its headquarters in the Hague suburb of Leidschendam – and beyond Lebanon.

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27 January 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

David Tolbert, currently serving as Registrar for the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, will take over as president of the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ) on March 2nd. The ICTJ works to redress and prevent severe human rights violations by confronting legacies of mass abuse.

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13 January 2010 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Antonio Cassese was the first president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and is now head of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL). He just announced that he will visit Lebanon in the coming weeks to complete the investigation into the assassination of former prime minister Rafiq Hariri.

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03 November 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

The first hearing on trials in absentia under international law will take place before the UN-backed Special Tribunal for Lebanon on November 11. The defence and the prosecution will present arguments on moving into absentia proceedings.

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14 October 2009 by Franck Petit

Appointed to a three-year term by the United Nations Secretary General last March, the French lawyer François Roux will take up his new role as head of the Defence Office at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) at the end of this month. During his 30-year career as an international lawyer, Roux has spent ten years working with international criminal tribunals. 

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14 October 2009 by Lynn Maalouf

Six months after the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) opened its doors, a drastically changed political and security environment in Lebanon, coupled with trim concrete output from The Hague, are driving even some of the tribunal’s staunchest advocates to adopt an increasingly cautious stance towards the court. This is visible in both dampened expectations and increasing questions as to whether the very mechanism will prove to be the best model for trying a crime of terrorism.

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