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Al Jadeed journalist Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial (Photo: Flickr/STLebanon)
04 May 2015

IJT 181 examines what two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon show about the main in absentia trial seeking to uncover who killed Lebanese ex-premier Rafik Hariri.

Other features:

  • Will Kenya’s restorative justice fund sideline truth commission findings?
  • Will new reparations body in Ivory Coast fulfill promise? 
  • Hopeful to move forward, Bosnian millennials try to unearth war skeletons

News briefs:

  • Netherlands court backs decision not to prosecute Dutchbat soldiers over Srebrenica deaths
  • ​Controversial Libyan Senussi trial to enter final phase
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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
23 March 2015 by Joost van Egmond, Belgrade (Serbia)

In a police action hailed as a major breakthrough, Serbia arrested last week eight suspects of mass killings after the fall of the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995. If they face court, it will be the biggest trial for war crimes in Serbia so far.

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31 March 2010 by -

The Serbian parliament early Wednesday passed a landmark resolution condemning the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslims but stopped short of labeling the killings a genocide.

The adoption of the text with a majority of 127 of the 173 lawmakers present ends years of denial by Serbian politicians about the scale of the killings.

"The parliament of Serbia strongly condemns the crime committed against the Bosnian Muslim population of Srebrenica in July 1995, as determined by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruling," the text says.

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01 April 2010 by -

The trial of Radovan Karadžić is scheduled to resume on 13 April with the start of the presentation of the prosecution’s evidence.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The order was made on the back of the appeals chamber’s dismissal of Karadžić’s appeal  to allow him to postpone his trial.

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05 July 2011 by -

The Dutch State has been held accountable for the death of Bosnian Muslim men in Srebrenica in 1995. The High Court in The Hague announced this decision in the case that was initiated by surviving relatives. The Netherlands has been ordered to pay damages.

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25 November 2009 by -

British lawyer Richard Harvey has been assigned as legal counsel to Radovan Karadzic who is on trial for war crimes in The Hague. 

By Karl Dowling

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) appointed the London-based barrister on November 5th following Karadzic’s refusal to attend the trial. Harvey has been given until March 2010 to prepare.

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28 October 2009 by -

Sweden released former Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic Tuesday, two-thirds into an 11-year jail term for war crimes, according to the Swedish prison authority. She immediately left Sweden and returned home to Serbia.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

“I don’t know what to think being free after eight years,” Plavsic told reporters after landing in Belgrade.

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague, which convicted Plavsic in February 2003, consented last month to grant her an early release.

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06 September 2011 by Geraldine Coughlan

Former Yugoslav Army chief Momcilo Perisic stood straight, eyes downcast as he listened to Judge Bakone Moloto sentence him to 27 years in prison. Proclaiming him guilty of a long list of war crimes and crimes against humanity over his role in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre when around 8,000 Bosnian Muslims were killed. Also, over the 44-month Siege of Sarajevo which made daily life almost impossible for civilians.

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28 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Few people expected Radovan Karadzic to show up to the start of his trial on Monday. He had already announced his intention not to attend a few days earlier in a written submission to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The former President of the Serb Republic in Bosnia stayed away to protest the fact that he hadn't been given more time to prepare his case. The pre-trial and appeals chambers rejected his request for a 10-month postponement earlier this month.

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14 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is working hard on his defence case from his prison cell in Scheveningen. Since the beginning of his pre-trial proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) 14 months ago, he has filed more than a hundred motions – including one that claims that former United States Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke had promised him immunity from prosecution.

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