Slobodan Milosevic

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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22 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From February 28 to May 9, the fifteen judges of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague listened to oral arguments from the parties in the genocide case that Bosnia-Herzegovina brought in March 1993 against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY), which became Serbia and Montenegro in 2003 and then simply Serbia after the May 21 yes vote on the referendum on Montenegro's independence. The ICJ is expected to issue a decision by year end. If convicted, Serbia could have to pay several billion dollars to its neighbor. This ruling represents more than just the first time that a State has been prosecuted for genocide. The Court in this case must render a decision on essentially two main points: does the ICJ have jurisdiction in this matter; and did the FRY commit genocide in Bosnia?

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10 April 2006 by Anne-Laure Porée

The outcome of Slobodan Milosevic trial may recur in Cambodia, where the government is delaying setting up the extraordinary chambers to try ex- Khmer Rouge leaders, adopting a strategy that increases the likelihood of these leaders dying before they ever come to trial. The latest holdup - the nomination of judges. On March 7, the UN Secretary-General gave Phnom Penh a list of international judges. Since then, the Supreme Council of Magistracy, presided by King Norodom Sihanouk, has been putting off announcing their nomination and the nomination of the Cambodian judges. Helen Jarvis, head of public affairs at the special court for Cambodia, is invariably insisting that these announcements, which have been promised since the beginning of 2006, will be made "soon." According to her, "It's a matter of weeks."

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04 December 2006 by Maria Kolesnikova

The Federation of Russia maintains verbal support for the International Criminal Court (ICC) and still considers ratification of the Rome Statute to be its "strategic goal." Yet, Moscow says it needs to adapt its legislation and to monitor the court's operation before it can ratify the Statute. However, the political will to ratify has been waning in the past few years. Moreover, as the conflict in Chechnya looms over the debate, Russia foresees more losses than gains from joining the ICC.

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06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".

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19 May 2010 by Bojana Barlovac

Serbian authorities have uncovered a mass grave near the southwestern town of Raska, on the border with Kosovo. A forthcoming exhumation at the site will show whether it contains corpses of 250 ethnic Albanian victims from the 1998-99 Kosovo conflict, as it is thought, Bruno Vekaric, spokesperson for Serbia’s war crimes prosecutor’s office, told the IJT.

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05 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

After four and a half years of proceedings, the trial of Vojislav Seselj will open at The Hague on November 7. For the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) represents the most important political figure to be tried since the death of former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic in March 2006. One year ago, the appeals chamber confirmed that Seselj had the right to self representation. But since then, the accused has refused to supply information regarding his financial situation and the tribunal is refusing to reimburse his defense fees.

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18 February 2008 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On March 10, 2008, almost two years to the day after former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic died, the trial of Jovica Stanisic and Franko "Frenki" Simatovic is expected to start before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). But this trial, which could help establish the link between Belgrade and the Bosnian Serbs who perpetrated the Srebrenica massacre, is likely to be something of a sideshow. 

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20 September 2004 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN-STUART

On 15 September, the trial of Slobodan Milosevic was adjourned for a month. After imposing lawyers on the accused and hea- ring only two defence witnesses, the Court was forced into an impasse when dozens of defence witnesses suddenly refused to give evidence in the space of a few days at The Hague.

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30 November 1999 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Over the last few weeks, British defence counsels Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins have given the Appeals Chamber of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) the opportunity to straighten out a trial gone awry after the Trial Chamber judges' decision of 3 September 2004 to impose defence counsel upon an unwilling Slobodan Milosevic.

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