Seselj

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Post-conflict rubble in Gori, Georgia, on 25 August 2008 (Photo: Flickr/Chuck Simmins)
27 February 2016

In this month's IJT we ask if the ICC's probe into alleged war crimes in Georgia in 2008 risks being one-sided as the court could be dragged in to a new Cold War. Will prosecutor Fatou Bensouda's move out of Africa be able to escape accusations of bias after Russia has already announced it will not cooperate?

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10 October 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For the last five weeks, at Slobodan Milosevic's invitation, the ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj, former opposition leader and deputy prime minister of Serbia during the war in the former Yugoslavia, has testified in his defence. Since 23 August, Seselj, who is also accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), has presented as facts opinions previously expressed by Milosevic. When the judges asked for evidence, Seselj replied that it existed but that he did not have it.

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06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".

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18 December 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

"For the Court the procedural problems have really started now," ICTY Registrar Hans Holthuis commented on Friday December 8. Vojislav Seselj, president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) and one of the most prominent defendants before the Hague-based court, has just ended the hunger strike he began twenty-eight days ago to protest his Court-imposed lawyer and maintain the right to defend himself. The Appeals Chamber upheld his right.

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05 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

After four and a half years of proceedings, the trial of Vojislav Seselj will open at The Hague on November 7. For the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) represents the most important political figure to be tried since the death of former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic in March 2006. One year ago, the appeals chamber confirmed that Seselj had the right to self representation. But since then, the accused has refused to supply information regarding his financial situation and the tribunal is refusing to reimburse his defense fees.

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03 December 2014 by IJT

Michael Scharf, interim dean of Case Western Reserve University School of Law, is an expert on maintaining control of war crimes trials whose video on the subject has been included in the UN Audiovisual Library of International Law. IJT asked him to share insights about the recent decision of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to release Serbian firebrand politician Vojislav Seselj.

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09 July 2014 by IJT

Vojislav Seselj voluntarily surrendered to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), in February 2003, to answer accusations of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role during the expulsion of non-Serbs from parts of Croatia and Bosnia between 1991 and 1993. Eleven and a half years on, the leader of the Serb Radical Party (SRS) remains in the custody.

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23 July 2014 by IJT

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) said on 17 July that it had decided to “terminate the process of provisional release” envisaged for the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) leader Vojislav Seselj during the last weeks [IJT-163]

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19 November 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

Vojislav Seselj returned to Serbia last week after the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) released the Serb nationalist politician on health grounds in a controversial ruling that sought no assurances from the accused.

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Supporters await the arrival of Vojislav Seselj  at Belgrade airport after his provisional release in November 2014
03 December 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Following the decision to provisionally release Serbian firebrand politician Vojislav Seselj on health grounds, pending judgment, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has come under scrutiny, with many fearing that the handling of this case could cast a shadow over the court’s legacy.

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