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Des veuves et des survivants remercient leurs avocats après la condamnation par une cour tchadienne en mars 2015 des agents de Habré (Photo : Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
19 June 2015 by Thierry Cruvellier

« La CPI en rêvait, les CAE l’ont fait.» Cette remarque d’un observateur de longue date des tribunaux pour crimes de guerre souligne l’une des raisons pour lesquelles les Chambres africaines extraordinaires (CAE) pourraient bien constituer l’évènement le plus important de cette année dans le domaine de la justice pénale internationale. L’objectif de la Cour pénale internationale est d’encourager les juridictions nationales à prendre en charge les poursuites judiciaires pour crimes de guerre ; or, les CAE l’ont déjà accompli. 

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Victims' widows and survivors thank lawyers after a court's March 2015 sentence against Habré's agents (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
15 June 2015 by Thierry Cruvellier

“What the ICC has dreamed of, the EAC is doing.” This remark by a long-time observer of war crimes tribunals highlights one of the reasons the Extraordinary African Chambers appears to be the most important event in the field of international criminal justice this year. The aim of the International Criminal Court has been to prompt national courts to take responsibility for war crimes prosecutions – something that the EAC has already achieved. 
 

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Chadians demonstrate for justice in January, following a second suspension of the trial against Habré’s henchmen (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
18 May 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After decades of appeals from victims, former Chadian dictator Hissène Habré will finally go on trial. On 20 July in Dakar, before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) criminal trial court, he will face charges of crimes against humanity, torture and war crimes committed in Chad between 1982 and 1990.

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Former Khmer Rouge minister Ieng Thirith, charged with genocide, crimes against humanity and breaches of the Geneva Conventions, appears at a pretrial hearing at the Cambodia tribunal in 2010. (Photo: Flickr/ECCC POOL/Tang Chhin Sothy)
20 May 2015

IJT 182 explores how so-called chivalrous beliefs and practices may be behind the rare prosecution of female war crimes suspects.

Other features:

  • A tug-of-war between Uganda and DRC over the extradition of Jamil Mukulu highlights trouble with judicial cooperation in Africa.
  • Colombian and Guatemalan survivors of sexual violence during their countries' armed conflicts fight for justice.
  • The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement tries to excise Balkan suspects of war crimes.

News brief:

  • A trial date for Chadian ex-dictator Hissène Habré has finally been set.
     
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Chadians demonstrate for justice in January, following a second suspension of the trial against Habré’s henchmen (Photo: Twitter/@HenriThulliez)
24 March 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After a 26-year wait and a four-month trial that saw victims finally confront alleged criminal accomplices of former dictator Hissène Habré [IJT-170], a Chad court is expected to deliver its ruling on 25 March. Judges will decide the fate of the 21 accused, facing charges of torture, murder, illegal arrest and arbitrary detention.

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Palais du 15 Janvier in N'Djaména, where the trial of 21 alleged Habré accomplices opened in November (Flickr/kendoerr)
10 February 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The prosecutor of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) last week filed his final indictment against Hissène Habré, bringing the trial of the former Chadian president [IJT-165] one step closer to reality.

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12 September 2011 by -

The head of the Ivory Coast's newly formed truth and reconciliation panel visited the diaspora in Senegal on Sunday to explain his mission to reunite the country torn apart by post-poll violence.

"We need to talk ... we need to admit we have turned a dark page," Charles Konan Banny, a former Ivorian prime minister, told his country's nationals in Dakar.

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03 December 2007 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 79

Table of content:

  • Sénégal: Pressions accrues pour le procès Habré
  • France: L’immunité pour Donald Rumsfeld
  • Tribunal pour les Khmers rouges: Levée de rideau sur les chambres
  • Tribunal pour l’ex-Yougoslavie: Série d’articles “bilans” & TPIY, une justice contre tous

Click here to download the IJT, No. 79

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03 December 2007 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 79

Table of content:

  • Senegal: Heightened pressure for Habre’s trial
  • France: Immunity for Rumsfeld
  • Khmer Rouge trials in Cambodia: The curtain rises  on the extraordinary chambers
  • Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: “Assessment” series & ICTY, justice against all

Click here to download the IJT, No. 79

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29 January 2011 by -

Twenty years ago, Hissène Habré, the dictator of Chad, was overthrown and fled to Senegal. The doors of his prisons flung open and I returned, a walking skeleton, to my family. I had watched hundreds of my cellmates die and I took an oath before God that I would bring Habré to justice in their name. For two decades I have been faithful to that quest, and our goal seemed near in November when international donors agreed to finance Habré's trial in Senegal.

By Souleymane Guengueng*

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Senegal