Saddam Hussein

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22 January 2007 by Philippe Mischkowsky

Editorialists for the Arab press were nearly all embarrassed by the hanging of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein on December 30, 2006 and torn between their acceptance, even approval of the death penalty, and their criticism of the circumstances surrounding the execution.

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27 January 2010 by Goran Baba Ali

Many Iraqis have been celebrating this week, following Monday’s execution of 68-year-old ‘Chemical Ali’. Former defense minister, Ali Hassan Al-Majid, a cousin of deposed Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, received a fourth death sentence on Sunday, January 19th, 2010. This time it was for ordering the gas attack on the Kurdish city of Halabja, during which an estimated 5,000 people were killed.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

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20 December 2004 by HEIKELKINA VERRIJN STUART

Dutchman Frans Van Anraat recently declared in a television interview that his deliveries of chemical substances to Iraq was just something he had done on the side. He had received a request from Iraq and had successfully delivered. Had he not done it, somebody else would have, he said. At the time, the Dutch public prosecutor had contemplated charging him with export violations, but since the crimes took place in the late 1980s, it was too late. The crimes would be considered prescriptible. On 6 December, 2004, the businessman was arrested and charged with complicity in genocide and war crimes.

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25 July 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 10 July, a District Court in The Hague extended the custody of Dutch businessman Frans van Anraat for a second three-month period (see IJT-17). The 62-year-old is charged with complicity to commit genocide and war crimes for supplying Saddam Hussein's regime with substances that were allegedly used to produce chemical weapons.

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10 October 2005 by Abdul Razzaq al-Saiedi

Saddam Hussein is scheduled to stand trial starting October 19th, more than 20 months after Americans arrested the former Iraqi leader. The trial will begin with Dujail, a town 35 miles north of Baghdad, where 143 people were killed by forces loyal to Saddam in 1982 in a reaction to an assassination attempt against Saddam. The former president will stand trial alongside 7 other defendants including his half-brother and former head of the Mukhabart secret police, the former prime minister, former Vice chairman of the Baath Party and the former chief judges of the revolution court.

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19 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Dutch prosecutors needed eleven hours on 7 December for their closing arguments against Frans van Anraat, the Dutch citizen accused of complicity in genocide on trial before a federal court in The Hague for his sales of chemicals to the Saddam Hussein regime in the 1980's. After a three-week trial, the prosecution requested the maximum prison sentence of 15 years. The prosecutor argued that the 63- year old Dutchman had known that the thousands of tons of thiodiglycol (TDG) he supplied were converted to chemical weapons, which Iraq used to attack Iran and its own Kurdish population.

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06 February 2006 by Abdul Razzaq al-Saiedi

The trial of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein resumed in Baghdad on the January 29, after being disrupted by the surprise resignation of the presiding judge. The trial resumed with fiery debates, ending with the eight co-defendants boycotting the trial on the tenth day, February 2. They were protesting the appointment of the new presiding judge, Ra'uf Abd al Rahman, who is trying to firmly bring the trial back under control. The court heard testimony from the 23rd prosecution witness in the absence of the defendants. The next court session is due on February 13.

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20 November 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

Nothing could distinguish the justice handed down for former tyrant Saddam Hussein in war-torn Baghdad more than that unfolding in the comforts of The Hague against modest Congolese militiaman Thomas Lubanga. Nothing could also be more different in the unanimous criticisms of the microcosm that is international justice, in how they deal with the trial of Saddam, and their leniency towards the way the International Criminal Court (ICC) works. Admittedly, Saddam's trial was a failure in many respects.

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11 September 2006 by Abdul Razzaq al-Saiedi

Saddam Hussein's second trial began on August 21. This case, which deals with the Anfal campaign against Iraqi Kurds in 1988, is of much bigger scale than the first case relating to a massacre of 148 Shi'ites in Dujail. It also involves genocide charges. In the midst of civil chaos, the Iraqi High Tribunal (IHT) is trying to improve its functioning.

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