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22 January 2007 by Philippe Mischkowsky

Editorialists for the Arab press were nearly all embarrassed by the hanging of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein on December 30, 2006 and torn between their acceptance, even approval of the death penalty, and their criticism of the circumstances surrounding the execution.

article
27 January 2010 by Goran Baba Ali

Many Iraqis have been celebrating this week, following Monday’s execution of 68-year-old ‘Chemical Ali’. Former defense minister, Ali Hassan Al-Majid, a cousin of deposed Iraqi president Saddam Hussein, received a fourth death sentence on Sunday, January 19th, 2010. This time it was for ordering the gas attack on the Kurdish city of Halabja, during which an estimated 5,000 people were killed.

article
23 December 2009 by -

The 96th edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

 

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 96 (PDF file)

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article
23 December 2009 by -

Sixteen victims of Saddam Hussein’s poison gas attacks on the Kurdish population in Northern Iraq and Iran in the 1980s are demanding compensation from Dutch businessman Frans van Anraat.

By Hermione Gee

The Dutchman provided the Iraqi government with the base material for mustard gas between 1984 and 1988. The Iraqi regime used the poison gas against Iranians and also against Iraqi Kurds in Halabja in 1988, where some 5,000 people were killed.

article
05 April 2004 by -

On 10 December 2003, three days before Saddam Hussein was captured, Iraq's Governing Council approved a law to create a special court to hear crimes committed by the Baathist regime. Although such a court will only begin its work after the withdrawal of the US army and the installation of an Iraqi government, the issue has already sparked broad debate in the Arab press.

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20 September 2004 by -

The trial of the ex-leaders of the Baath party will take place «before the Iraqi elections scheduled for January 2005,» according to the government minister Qassem Daoud. Aside from the violence that threatens to undermine the trial and Iraqi elections, another obstacle has emerged: finding a «director» for the Iraqi Special Tribunal. Salem Chalabi, who was appointed head of the tribunal for three years, then accused of murder in August, was dismissed from his post on 7 September.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

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21 November 2005 by -

On November 16, Philip Alston, the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, asked the Iraqi government to conduct an independent investigation into the murders of two defense lawyers in the trial of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. The trial began in Baghdad on October 19 (IJT-33-34). The victims, Saadoun al-Janabi and Adel al-Zubeidi, represented Awad Hamed al- Bandar, former chief justice of the revolutionary court and Taha Yasin Ramadan, former Vice President of Iraq, respectively.

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10 October 2005 by -

The spokesperson for the Iraqi government announced in early September that the trial of Saddam Hussein and seven officials from his fallen regime is to open on 19 October, APF reports. The first charges against the ex-dictator centre on the massacre of Shiite villagers in Doujaïl, north of Baghdad in 1982. The eight defendants face charges of "executing 143 Iraqi citizens, kidnapping 399 families, destroying their houses and razing their [farm] land".

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06 December 2004 by -

While the trial of the former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein will not begin until next year, his lieutenants will appear this month before the Special Court, charged with crimes against humanity, announced the Iraqi Deputy Prime minister Barham Salih on 29 November. Ali Hassan al-Majid, alias «Chemical Ali», is thought to be responsible for gassing the Kurds of Halabja in March 1998, causing the deaths of 5000 people. A former advisor to Saddam Hussein, Watban Ibrahim Hassan al-Tikriti, could also find himself in the witness box soon.

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