article
23 July 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée and Chheang Bopha

On July 18, the prosecutors communicated their introductory submission to the investigating judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) responsible for trying former Khmer Rouge leaders. Five of them are suspected of having "committed, aided and abetted, or borne superior responsibility" for 25 separate acts of "murder, torture, forcible transfer, unlawful detention, forced labor, and religious, political, and ethnic persecution." Though their names remain officially confidential before arrest, they have already been cited by observers: Duch, Nuon Chea, Ieng Sary, Khieu Samphan and Ieng Thirith.

article
07 May 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

Since opening in July 2006, the Extraordinary Chambers, tasked with trying former Khmer Rouge leaders, has been paralyzed by the failure to adopt internal, procedural rules. Now, at last, the court is likely to have its rules in place by the end of May. On April 28, after five months of deadlock, the Cambodian Bar Association removed the last major obstacle by agreeing to lower its registration fees for foreign lawyers from $4,900 to $500. Rupert Skilbeck, Chief of the Defense Support Section, talks with IJT about issues of concern for the defense.

article
20 November 2006 by THIERRY CRUVELLIER and Anne-Laure Porée

On 20 November, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) were to welcome the comments of non-governmental organizations on its draft internal rules. In a move of rare transparency, the tribunal responsible for trying former Khmer Rouge leaders made the document public and open to suggestions. The ECCC are scheduled to adopt the final version of the rules on 25 November. Both in terms of procedure and victims' representation, the new Cambodian "model" is already shaping up to be an unprecedented experience in international criminal justice.

issue
07 May 2007

The rules for the Defense: "a step backward"

Since opening in July 2006, the Extraordinary Chambers, tasked with trying former Khmer Rouge leaders, has been paralyzed by the failure to adopt internal, procedural rules. Now, at last, the court is likely to have its rules in place by the end of May. On April 28, after five months of deadlock, the Cambodian Bar Association removed the last major obstacle by agreeing to lower its registration fees for foreign lawyers from $4,900 to $500. Rupert Skilbeck, Chief of the Defense Support Section, talks with IJT about issues of concern for the defense.

Controversy between the president and judges

On April 25, a federal appellate court in Buenos Aires ruled that the presidential pardons granted to former junta members years ago were unconstitutional. This ruling opens the door for Rafael Videla, currently under house arrest, to be put in prison and for the transfer of Emilio Massera, declared senile, to a military hospital. Mostly, it comes at a time when the pace of trials for crimes against humanity has created a rift between President Nestor Kirchner and the country's top criminal court, the Court of Cassation.

South Africa, peace mediator above all

South Africa has unmatched economic and moral power on the African continent, where the International Criminal Court (ICC) has focused its first prosecutions. The government's attitudes towards the ICC are shaped by its anti-colonial struggle against apartheid and by its own choice of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Brief news:

• Russia: Defendants in Chechnya murder trial go missing

• Darfur: the ICC issues two arrest warrants

• Bagaragaza, first transfer from the ICTR

• Timor-Leste: the truth according to Wiranto

 

Rupert Skilbeck