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25 May 2011 by Thierry Cruvellier and Franck Petit

Four senior officers of the Rwandan army were convicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on 17 May for crimes committed during the genocide in 1994. But in the case of the former chief of staff of the Gendarmerie Augustin Ndindiliyimana, the sentencing clearly exposed the damage done by one of the tribunal’s worst failings: a preventive detention that went out of control. 

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20 July 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Karegyesa leads the prosecutions at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), which is finalising its mandate. 

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24 May 2011 by -

Four senior officers of the Rwandan army were convicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) on 17 May for crimes committed during the genocide in 1994. But in the case of the former chief of staff of the Gendarmerie Augustin Ndindiliyimana, the sentencing clearly exposed the damage done by one of the tribunal’s worst failings: a preventive detention that went out of control.

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27 September 2001 by -

The Rwandan minister for justice, Jean de Dieu Mucyo, recognises that some elements of the Rwandan Patriotic Army (RPA) were guilty of crimes against Hutus during the civil war and after the genocide. However, he refuses all comparison between « these isolated acts and a long-planned genocide » On 27 September, during a speech before hundreds of prisoners gathered in the administrative centre of the Ntongwe district in Gitarama province, in the centre of Rwanda, the justice minister, Jean de Dieu Mucyo, acknowledged that some elements of the RPA had deaths on their conscience.

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30 March 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

It is winter, four years after the Rwandan genocide. Joseph Mpambara arrives at Schiphol airport, carrying a false Ugandan passport. He tells Dutch Immigration officials that he fled his village Mugonero in 1994. He says he feared for his life as Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) rebels massacred Hutus. Later, Mpambara feared persecution because he had testified in defence of his brother at the ICTR.

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11 April 2008 by -

On 8 April, Spanish judge Fernando Andreu declared admissible the complaint [for the assassination of nine Spanish citizens between 1994 and 2000] lodged on behalf of the International Forum for Truth and Justice in Africa and the Great Lakes Region, on 22 February. The complaint targets 69 military leaders of the Rwandan Patriotic Front, which has been in power in Rwanda since July 1994.

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24 October 2005 by Louis-Martin Rugendo

Officially begun on March 10, 2005, Rwanda's community-based gacaca courts are facing major difficulties and ambiguities. Expectations for the gacaca are divergent, to say the least, and the main challenges for these courts include: lack of resources, political interference, lack of qualified judges and the complexity of the cases being tried. Six months later, only 10% of the gacaca have begun trials and Rwandans are testing the impact of these courts.

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25 April 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

When the defence case in the military trial opened on 11 April before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), there was an inevitable feeling of vertigo. "The first word that springs to mind is: Finally! Eleven years after the crimes, nine years after his arrest, eight years and three months after his arrival in Arusha, Colonel Bagosora can finally begin to explain himself. Raphaël Constant, the lawyer for the most famous Rwandan genocide suspect, is one of only two people in the courtroom to have followed the lengthy proceedings against Théoneste Bagosora and his three co-accused from the start.

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23 May 2005 by Emmanuel Chicon

The second "Rwandan" trial that opened in Brussels on 9 May failed to attract the crowd of impassioned spectators who had gathered for the judgement of the Butare Four in 2001. This time, two small-time businessmen appeared in the dock, a successful beer wholesaler and his half-brother, the patron of a street bar and local bus company. Both are accused of actively participating in the execution of the genocide in the prefecture of Kibungo.

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07 November 2005 by our correspondent in Arusha

Leading ICTR defendant Colonel Théoneste Bagosora began giving testimony on October 24 for the period leading up to the fateful date of April 6, 1994 - the day the Rwandan genocide began. The former directeur de cabinet in the Defense Ministry denied responsibility for disseminating a "definition of the Tutsi enemy" within the army in 1992. He especially denied being the colonel of the "apocalypse."

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