richard goldstone

article
19 January 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Goldstone, Louise Arbour and Carla Del Ponte served as prosecutors for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The two tribunals shared a prosecutor until 2003. Frederiek de Vlaming completed her dissertation at the University of Amsterdam, analysing how the three prosecutors selected their suspects, focusing mainly on the ICTY.

article
24 April 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

When Dutch ad hoc defence counsel Tjarda van der Spoel, who was assigned to the DRC case on August 1, 2005, arrived at the ICC building in The Hague, he was not too sure what his role would be. He had to hand in his passport to get an ICC badge and was accompanied throughout the building by a security guard. He did not have a room where he could hang his coat and put on his robe. For reasons of confidentiality he was not allowed to electronically file submissions from outside the building. But, Van der Spoel told IJT, "everybody I met in the huge white building on Maanweg was friendly enough and willing to cooperate."

article
03 December 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From its very creation in May 1993, The Hague-based ICTY was branded the heir of the 1945 Nuremberg tribunal. But while the Nuremberg prosecutors had only Germans in the dock, this new UN court would make a point of not being victor's justice. With the UN Security Council mandate "to maintain and restore international peace and security" came the Tribunal's obligation to investigate and prosecute crimes committed by individuals on all sides of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. The ICTY has done this, but it has not avoided political justice.

article
19 November 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 8, thirteen years ago, the United Nations Security Council created the ICTR to try those primarily responsible for the serious crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994. Representatives of the Arusha tribunal promise it will have finished its first instance trials by the end of 2008, except for one, which will be completed in 2009. Two uncertainties still weigh on the ICTR: its ability to transfer some of the accused to national courts and the 14 fugitives. But most of all, the ICTR continues to mourn its most serious failure: the absence of proceedings against the winners of the war.