Richard Dicker

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20 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. It was a success for those who feared funding cuts. But many participants bitterly lamented the lack of passion that marked the week's meeting.

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25 September 2006 by Franck Petit

On September 28, the judges of the International Criminal Court (ICC) were to hear prosecution and defense arguments before ruling on the opening of the Lubanga trial. This hearing was postponed for the second time. Back in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), many are at a loss as to how the prosecutor could produce such feeble results after two years of investigation. Already disappointed that the most senior officials are not being prosecuted, the Congolese are now frustrated to see only one defendant - Thomas Lubanga - charged with only one crime, the enlistment of child soldiers.

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23 October 2006 by Christine Chaumeau

China is keeping a polite distance from international criminal justice. Beijing is hardly disinterested, but China does want to make sure that these new global mechanisms are not going to infringe upon its sovereignty by delving into particularly sensitive cases such as Tibet. 

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20 November 2006 by Adele Waugaman

The United Kingdom, one of the earliest and strongest advocates of the International Criminal Court (ICC), has been challenged continuously by the task of balancing its principled support for international justice with practical policy decisions. At home, London has rethought how to legally address criminal acts committed by its soldiers in Iraq; on the UN Security Council, it has sought to broker compromise between its ICC support and the formal opposition of its closest ally, the United States; and in The Hague, it has established a close yet critical relationship with an institution it played a key role in creating. In its response to the challenges presented in each of these settings, London has demonstrated confident realism in its principled yet pragmatic support for the ICC.

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17 December 2007 by Franck Petit

Five years after its creation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) employs 750 people, but has only two defendants and one trial scheduled for 2008. During December's Assembly of the States Parties, the major sponsors—led by Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom and France—came to an understanding that, as one delegate put it, "the ICC is no longer a new institution". A Japanese delegate stated, "It is now in adolescence, and we need to give it certain obligations". He expressed his surprise that the court was requesting a 10% increase in funding for 2008 "even though it still has 10 million euros to spend in 2007." The only trial scheduled for 2008, that of Thomas Lubanga, had already been budgeted for 2007.