article
24 September 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée

The eighty-one-year-old former right hand man of Khmer Rouge number one Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, was arrested in Pailin at dawn on September 19 and taken by helicopter to the Cambodian capital. He was brought before the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), which are tasked with trying the most important Khmer Rouge leaders who ruled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. Nuon Chea is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes.

article
26 October 2011 by Robert Carmichael

The elderly defendants deny charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. They stand accused of responsibility for the deaths of up to 2.2 million people during the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-79 rule. Tribunal spokesman Lars Olsen explained the significance of Case 002, as it is known in court parlance.

article
19 July 2004 by Christine Chaumeau

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

article
21 September 2010 by Lula Ahrens

“I’m afraid it won’t meet international standards,” warns Nuon Chea’s - or brother Number two’s -lawyer. He has serious doubts about the fairness of the trial which is set to start in 2011. Nuon Chea is among four former Khmer Rouge leaders indicted last week for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity and, under Cambodian law, murder, torture and religious persecution, at Cambodia’s war crimes tribunal.

article
23 October 2006 by Christine Chaumeau

China is keeping a polite distance from international criminal justice. Beijing is hardly disinterested, but China does want to make sure that these new global mechanisms are not going to infringe upon its sovereignty by delving into particularly sensitive cases such as Tibet. 

issue
30 November 1999

Who believes in a Phnom Penh trial?

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

Widow calls France to account for Boun-Hor death

Will light ever be shed on events leading to the disappearance in April 1975 of the former president of the Cambodian national assembly Ung Boun-Hor, who was forced to leave his refuge at the French Embassy in Khmer Rouge-occupied Phnom Penh?

Memories of Iraq in Kuwait and Iran

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

Kibuye, a "successful" legal saga

In the space of a week, just before the summer recess, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down one life sentence, confirmed a second and heard the parties debate two other appeal verdicts. The four cases all concern Rwandan personalities prosecuted for crimes committed in 1994 in the same region, eastern Kibuye.

issue
20 January 2012

Summary and link to PDF of IJT 143.

issue
18 July 2012

Summary and link to PDF of IJT 155.

 

Pol Pot