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Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic in the dock at the ICTY in June 2011 (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
28 June 2016 by Iva Vukusic The Hague

The trial of Bosnian Serb army commander Ratko Mladic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) recently heard what is likely its last witness, Russian colonel Andrei Demurenko, invited by the defense to testify in relation to one mortar attack that killed around 40 and wounded over 70 people in a crowded Sarajevo market in August 1995. His testimony went on for hours, discussing projectiles, trajectories, meters and degrees, with the witness frequently evading giving clear, short answers.

His testimony is based on an investigation he claims he conducted while working for the UN protection force UNPROFOR in Sarajevo. That investigation showed, according to the witness, that the Bosnian Serb army could not have been responsible for the massacre. The testimony ended abruptly when Demurenko checked out of his hotel and never showed up to answer the final questions. The Russian colonel may have left suddenly because he did not like the questions of the prosecution, or because the presiding judge rejected his request to shake hands with Mladic in court. The unusual ending made me reflect on outreach and how it can be successful when what goes on in the courtroom is dull, or simply bizarre.

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Then ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo with locals in the DRC's Ituri district
24 September 2014 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

For the majority of inhabitants in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, the International Criminal Court has had no impact on peace or justice, reports a study published this month by the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Of over 5,000 people surveyed in Ituri and the Kivus, 28 percent think the court’s influence has been negative. IJT spoke to report co-author Patrick Vinck. 

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