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Witness appears before the ECCC in case 002/02 against on 13 January 2016 (Photo: Flickr/ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng)
10 February 2016 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Judges at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) continued this month hearing eyewitness testimony about how the Khmer Rouge targeted Cham Muslims and ethnic Vietnamese, including women and children. Case 002/02, part two of the case against former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan [IJT-176, IJT-179], tackles the question of whether the regime committed genocide as per the narrow legal definition.

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24 September 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée

The eighty-one-year-old former right hand man of Khmer Rouge number one Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, was arrested in Pailin at dawn on September 19 and taken by helicopter to the Cambodian capital. He was brought before the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), which are tasked with trying the most important Khmer Rouge leaders who ruled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. Nuon Chea is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes.

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02 February 2011 by Jared Ferrie

Three former Khmer Rouge leaders asked a UN-backed international tribunal on Monday to free them as they await the long anticipated, but yet unscheduled, trial. 

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26 October 2011 by Robert Carmichael

The elderly defendants deny charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. They stand accused of responsibility for the deaths of up to 2.2 million people during the Khmer Rouge’s 1975-79 rule. Tribunal spokesman Lars Olsen explained the significance of Case 002, as it is known in court parlance.

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A medical examining room at the ICTY (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
21 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The on-going controversy over the provisional release of Serbian ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj [IJT-179] from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has recast the spotlight on how courts deal with ailing accused. It also begets a fundamental question: what determines if someone is fit to stand trial?

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Victor Koppe, defence attorney for Nuon Chea (front row, right) at the ECCC in January 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ECCC/Peter Ford)
07 April 2015 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), case 002/02 against former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan is in full swing [IJT-168]. Defence lawyer Victor Koppe, who represents Nuon Chea, spoke to IJT, noting, among other things, that bias against the accused has been unmatched. 

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American journalist Elizabeth Becker testifies as an expert witness in Case 002/02 at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (Photo: ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng/Flickr/krtribunal)
23 February 2015 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

When former Washington Post correspondent Elizabeth Becker testified as an expert witness this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (ECCC), she described a surreal visit to Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge regime where “every move was controlled” and everything staged for foreign journalists' benefit.

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21 June 2011 by Jared Ferrie

Thirty-two years after the fall of one of the 20th century’s bloodiest regimes, a tribunal in Cambodia will begin trying the four most senior Khmer Rouge leaders still alive. But the trial commences under a cloud of controversy, with observers questioning the UN-backed court’s independence.

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23 July 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée and Chheang Bopha

On July 18, the prosecutors communicated their introductory submission to the investigating judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) responsible for trying former Khmer Rouge leaders. Five of them are suspected of having "committed, aided and abetted, or borne superior responsibility" for 25 separate acts of "murder, torture, forcible transfer, unlawful detention, forced labor, and religious, political, and ethnic persecution." Though their names remain officially confidential before arrest, they have already been cited by observers: Duch, Nuon Chea, Ieng Sary, Khieu Samphan and Ieng Thirith.

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18 February 2008 by Erika Kinetz

Victims of the Khmer Rouge had their first, historic day in court this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). On February 8, Theary Seng, who is quickly becoming the poster child for the genocide that ravaged Cambodia in the late 1970s, stood to address a man she believes was responsible for the deaths of her parents and 1.7 million other Cambodians: Nuon Chea, Pol Pot's right-hand man and most trusted deputy, who is charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. "For us, the graveyard was our playground," she said.

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