article
Visitors must cross a moat before entering the International Criminal Court's new permanent premises (Photo: Tjitske Lingsma)
15 December 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma and Janet H. Anderson, The Hague

Six block buildings, the tallest holding the courtrooms, stand in a row along the coastal landscape of The Hague. They are bedecked with trapezoid windows, meant to reflect the changing daylight and convey a sense of transparency. High fences are absent. The sand dunes that protect the Netherlands from the North Sea’s high tide are, along with many other measures, ingeniously used to provide security. This is the new permanent premises of the International Criminal Court (ICC).

article
Dutchbat march on Veterans Day 2014 in The Hague (Photo: Flickr/faceme)
04 May 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

A district court in the Netherlands last week confirmed a 2013 decision by prosecutors not to charge former Dutchbat commander Thom Karremans and two subordinates for three deaths in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. The victims were among the nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims killed while under supposed protection by Dutch UN peacekeepers.

issue
Al Jadeed journalist Karma Khayat flanked by defence lawyers at the opening hearing of her contempt trial (Photo: Flickr/STLebanon)
04 May 2015

IJT 181 examines what two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon show about the main in absentia trial seeking to uncover who killed Lebanese ex-premier Rafik Hariri.

Other features:

  • Will Kenya’s restorative justice fund sideline truth commission findings?
  • Will new reparations body in Ivory Coast fulfill promise? 
  • Hopeful to move forward, Bosnian millennials try to unearth war skeletons

News briefs:

  • Netherlands court backs decision not to prosecute Dutchbat soldiers over Srebrenica deaths
  • ​Controversial Libyan Senussi trial to enter final phase
article
The ICC trial chamber acquitted Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
21 April 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Over two years since his initial acquittal by the International Criminal Court (ICC), former Congolese militia leader Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui is still in the Netherlands fighting another legal battle: to get asylum in the ICC’s host country.

article
30 June 2010 by -

Dutch police arrested a 63 year-old woman last week on suspicion of involvement in the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Yvonne Ntacyobatabara is said to have led a group of young men in the mass murder of Tutsis and moderate Hutus in the Gikondo locality near the Rwandan capital Kigali.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

A former member of the extremist Coalition for the Defence of the Republic, she moved to the Netherlands in 1998 and obtained Dutch citizenship in 2004. She was later sentenced in absentia to life imprisonment by a local gacaca court in Gikondo.

issue
14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

article
Entrance of Dutchbat compound in Potocari near Srebrenica. Copyright Joost van Egmond
13 January 2015 by Joost van Egmond, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Over a year after the highest court in the Netherlands held the Dutch state responsible for the fate of his father and brother, who were killed after the fall of the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995, Hasan Nuhanovic still awaits satisfactory compensation. His case is often cited as crucial for damages claims to come, for Srebrenica and beyond.

article
04 April 2014 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Since he was acquitted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in December 2012, the fate of the Congolese ex-militia leader Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui remains unsettled. Last week he appeared in a Dutch district court to appeal against a decision to deny him asylum in the Netherlands, showing how the ICC, like its ad hoc predecessors, has not prepared for possible acquittals.

article
14 May 2014 by IJT

“He is very weak,” says his lawyer Göran Sluiter. Floribert Ndjabu Ngabu, a Congolese witness kept for three years at the International Criminal Court (ICC) detention unit has been on hunger strike for three weeks now. He is protesting against his stalled asylum bid in The Netherlands. 

article
09 July 2014 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Three Congolese witnesses of the International Criminal Court (ICC), who were denied asylum in The Netherlands, were deported on Sunday to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Their return was handled by the Dutch authorities, said their lawyer Flip Schüller.

Pages

The Netherlands