Néstor Kirchner

article
05 May 2008 by Santiago O’Donnell

The Navy Mechanics School, known as ESMA, lies on 17 acres of the finest real estate in Buenos Aires, surrounded by parks, lakes, a river and an equestrian club, and a stone’s throw away from the bustling promenade that lines the Rio de la Plata River. At the entrance on Libertador Avenue (the main boulevard going through the capital), behind a tall fence of black iron spears, ESMA’s imposing, two-story portico rests on four Greek columns. A large stone staircase rises above a manicured lawn. Beyond, clusters of trees and buildings spread across a lush, sprawling park crisscrossed with tree-lined alleys.

article
11 April 2008 by Santiago O’Donnell

Thirty years after the start of its last and most bloody dictatorship, Argentina is debating forms of compensation for its victims. Over the last few weeks, Congress has been the scene of discussions over a new law to compensate political exiles for losses incurred as a result of their having to leave the country. The outcome of this legal, ethical and political debate is difficult to predict, but whatever the conclusion, it will set an important precedent for other Latin American countries.

article
07 May 2007 by Santiago O’Donnell

On April 25, a federal appellate court in Buenos Aires ruled that the presidential pardons granted to former junta members years ago were unconstitutional. This ruling opens the door for Rafael Videla, currently under house arrest, to be put in prison and for the transfer of Emilio Massera, declared senile, to a military hospital. Mostly, it comes at a time when the pace of trials for crimes against humanity has created a rift between President Nestor Kirchner and the country's top criminal court, the Court of Cassation.

issue
07 May 2007

The rules for the Defense: "a step backward"

Since opening in July 2006, the Extraordinary Chambers, tasked with trying former Khmer Rouge leaders, has been paralyzed by the failure to adopt internal, procedural rules. Now, at last, the court is likely to have its rules in place by the end of May. On April 28, after five months of deadlock, the Cambodian Bar Association removed the last major obstacle by agreeing to lower its registration fees for foreign lawyers from $4,900 to $500. Rupert Skilbeck, Chief of the Defense Support Section, talks with IJT about issues of concern for the defense.

Controversy between the president and judges

On April 25, a federal appellate court in Buenos Aires ruled that the presidential pardons granted to former junta members years ago were unconstitutional. This ruling opens the door for Rafael Videla, currently under house arrest, to be put in prison and for the transfer of Emilio Massera, declared senile, to a military hospital. Mostly, it comes at a time when the pace of trials for crimes against humanity has created a rift between President Nestor Kirchner and the country's top criminal court, the Court of Cassation.

South Africa, peace mediator above all

South Africa has unmatched economic and moral power on the African continent, where the International Criminal Court (ICC) has focused its first prosecutions. The government's attitudes towards the ICC are shaped by its anti-colonial struggle against apartheid and by its own choice of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Brief news:

• Russia: Defendants in Chechnya murder trial go missing

• Darfur: the ICC issues two arrest warrants

• Bagaragaza, first transfer from the ICTR

• Timor-Leste: the truth according to Wiranto