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04 May 2010 by -

Former Argentine military leader Jorge Rafael Videla has been charged with an additional 49 cases of kidnapping, torture and murder. He will also be tried in September for stealing 33 babies of political opponents.

By Lula Ahrens

Videla, who ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1981, was sentenced to life in prison in 1985 for human rights abuses committed during Argentina’s Dirty War, including the murders of 66 people and the torture of 93 others.

article
27 January 2010 by -

Germany has issued an arrest warrant for Argentina’s former dictator General Jorge Videla on suspicion of murdering a German man.

The Nuremberg prosecutor’s office opened a probe into the junta’s former leaders, including Videla, at the end of the 1990s over the killing and disappearance of Germans during Agentina’s so-called ‘dirty war’. But the initial investigations were stopped in 2008 after an Argentine court rejected an extradition request submitted by the German government.

article
10 February 2010 by -

Vojislav Šešelj, leader of Serbia’s ultra-nationalist Radical Party, currently standing trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY ) for alleged war crimes, has been charged with contempt of court.

By Vessela Evrova

The court initiated contempt proceedings against Šešelj on February 4th for having disclosed information on 11 protected witnesses, including their real names, occupations and places of residence, in a book he authored.

article
10 February 2010 by -

A federal judge in the American state of Florida has ordered the son of former Liberian president Charles Taylor to pay $22.4 million to five people tortured during Liberia’s civil war.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The Liberian plaintiffs sued Charles McArthur Emmanuel, also known as “Chuckie” Taylor, shortly after he was sentenced to 97 years in prison for his role in one of Africa’s bloodiest civil wars. He was the first person to be convicted by a US federal court of torture committed outside the United States.

article
24 February 2010 by Maria Morina

“The government does not understand that [we] should be working for them, not against them”, says Tatyana Kasatkina, Executive Director of Memorial, a human rights research centre based in Moscow. It was founded towards the end of the Soviet era with the goal of preserving the societal memory of political persecution and oppression. Today it works in post-Soviet states, monitoring human rights and helping “to promote mature civil society and democracy based on the rule of law.” Kasatkina spoke to the IJT at her office in Moscow. 

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