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08 November 2004 by -

Over the last few weeks, British defence counsels Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins have given the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) the opportunity to straighten out a trial gone awry after the Trial Chamber judges' decision of 3 September 2004 to impose defence counsel upon an unwilling Slobodan Milosevic.

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20 December 2004 by -

The British lawyers assigned by theTribunal for the Former Yugoslavia to defend Slobodan Milosevic are desperately seeking an escape route. On 7 December, the trial chamber dismissed the request by Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins to withdraw their assignment as defence counsel. Milosevic continues to assert that he will never accept any active involvement by Kay and Higgins in his case, not even if he were to fall seriously ill. The lawyers continue their daily presence at the hearing, visibly distraught.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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10 October 2005 by Adele Waugaman

Most people hear the words "war crime" and think of the Nuremberg Trials or Slobodan Milosevic's trial, but that may soon change. Up till now, British soldiers have never been charged under this highly symbolic label. However, in July the British Attorney-General reversed this trend by announcing that three soldiers were being charged with "war crimes under the ICC Act [of] 2001". That announcement made Britain the first member of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to charge its own citizens under such law.

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23 May 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Of the 17 charges in the Kosovo indictment against Slobodan Milosevic, the massacre at Racak is the only crime that took place before the NATO bombings of May 1999. At his trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former Serb president is trying to prove that he was fighting a just war in Kosovo against insurgents and terrorists.

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10 October 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For the last five weeks, at Slobodan Milosevic's invitation, the ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj, former opposition leader and deputy prime minister of Serbia during the war in the former Yugoslavia, has testified in his defence. Since 23 August, Seselj, who is also accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), has presented as facts opinions previously expressed by Milosevic. When the judges asked for evidence, Seselj replied that it existed but that he did not have it.

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07 February 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Slobodan Milosevic sounded almost jubilant when he called two French witnesses, both former UNPROFOR members sympathetic to the suffering of the Serb people. Nurse Eve Crepin's testimony was so general that presiding judge Patrick Robinson dismissed it as "a conversation with a cup of tea on the veranda". But her partner, former army doctor Patrick Barriot, gave evidence that sparked intense questioning from both prosecutors and judges.

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03 December 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From its very creation in May 1993, The Hague-based ICTY was branded the heir of the 1945 Nuremberg tribunal. But while the Nuremberg prosecutors had only Germans in the dock, this new UN court would make a point of not being victor's justice. With the UN Security Council mandate "to maintain and restore international peace and security" came the Tribunal's obligation to investigate and prosecute crimes committed by individuals on all sides of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia. The ICTY has done this, but it has not avoided political justice.

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05 February 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For more than ten years, Bosnian Serbs have insisted that Sarajevo Muslims bombed their own at the City Market on 28 August 1995, leaving 43 people dead and around 90 wounded. The logic behind their reasoning was that the people of the city that had been under siege for more than three years were desperate to make the world aware of their suffering and to trigger NATO air strikes against Bosnian Serb positions around Sarajevo. In the first weeks of Dragomir Milosevic's trial before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), new light was shed on the question of who was responsible for the Markale Market massacre.

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22 May 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

From February 28 to May 9, the fifteen judges of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague listened to oral arguments from the parties in the genocide case that Bosnia-Herzegovina brought in March 1993 against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY), which became Serbia and Montenegro in 2003 and then simply Serbia after the May 21 yes vote on the referendum on Montenegro's independence. The ICJ is expected to issue a decision by year end. If convicted, Serbia could have to pay several billion dollars to its neighbor. This ruling represents more than just the first time that a State has been prosecuted for genocide. The Court in this case must render a decision on essentially two main points: does the ICJ have jurisdiction in this matter; and did the FRY commit genocide in Bosnia?

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