Milosevic trial

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26 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".