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26 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

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06 November 2006 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 56

Table of content:

  • International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: Seselj in the footsteps of Milosevic
  • International Criminal Court: Chap. III of our diplomatic series; “Continued ambiguity for Paris”

Click here to download the IJT, No. 56

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article
24 May 2004 by -

Initially due to begin on 8 June, the defence phase of the trial of the former Serbian head of State Slobodan Milosevic has been postponed to 22 June. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) announced on 5 May that the two-week delay was partly due to the state of health of the accused. «His doctors have told him to rest,» said the ICTY. Medical reports say that Milosevic, 62, is suffering from cardiovascular problems and high blood pressure.

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21 June 2004 by -

The ex-president of Yugoslavia Slobodan Milosevic, who will be conducting his own defence from 5 July, filed a list of 1400 defence witnesses on 17 June to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Among them is the former US president Bill Clinton and British prime minister Tony Blair. The judges deferred their ruling on the motion, and asked Milosevic to justify his request in writing, which he refused to do.

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01 June 2001 by -

Former president of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

Slobodan Milosevic is accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, violations of the laws or customs of war and grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions, crimes committed in Kosovo, Croatia and Bosnia. His trial is underway before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY).
© Réseau Intermedia.

Identity

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07 June 2004 by -

The presentation of evidence in the trial of former Serb president Slobodan Milosevic, which was postponed until 22 June, has been further delayed until 5 July. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) announced on 27 May that the new postponement was due to the defendant's ill health. Trial dates were announced as follows: 5-7, 19-21 and 27-29 July. Milosevic, 62, has chosen to represent himself and plans to call 1631 defence witnesses.

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19 July 2004 by -

Judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ruled on 16 July to postpone the opening of Slobodan Milosevic\'s trial to 31 August. A medical report submitted to the court concluded that the former Yugoslav president\'s blood pressure was too high for him to stand trial. Proceedings began before the international court in February 2002, where Milosevic, 62, is accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. When the prosecution phase came to a close in February 2003, the judges ruled that the trial would resume on 8 June.

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20 September 2004 by -

On 15 September, the trial of Slobodan Milosevic was adjourned for a month. After imposing lawyers on the accused and hearing only two defence witnesses, the Court was forced into an impasse when dozens of defence witnesses suddenly refused to give evidence in the space of a few days at The Hague.

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24 May 2004 by -

Initially due to begin on 8 June, the defence phase of the trial of the former Serbian head of State Slobodan Milosevic has been postponed to 22 June. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) announced on 5 May that the two-week delay was partly due to the state of health of the accused. «His doctors have told him to rest,» said the ICTY. Medical reports say that Milosevic, 62, is suffering from cardiovascular problems and high blood pressure.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

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