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24 March 2010 by Hélène Michaud

Former Ugandan Minister for Pacification Betty Bigome is one of the main negotiators between the government of Uganda and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebels in the north of the country. She first met LRA leader Joseph Kony in 1994 and then again a decade later. She told the IJT about her encounters with one of Africa’s most brutal warlords.

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17 March 2008 by -

Read here the International Justice Tribune, No. 85

Table of content:

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11 July 2011 by -

Uganda on Monday opened its first war crimes trial against a commander of the Lord's Resistance Army rebels accused of brutal civilian killings during a 20-year war in the north of the country.

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19 July 2004 by -

Henceforth, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and northern Uganda will be the first cases to be studied by the International Criminal Court (ICC). On 6 July, the Court announced that the both cases have been placed under the authority of the pre-trial chambers. The main armed group the Court will be probing in Uganda is the Lord\'s Resistance Army (LRA). Recently, the rebel movement suffered a setback with the capture, announced by Kampala on 13 July, of one of its main leaders, the seventy-year-old Kenneth Banya.

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19 January 2011 by Mohammed Abdulrahman

As Southern Sudan takes its final steps towards separating from Khartoum and becoming an independent state, one of its immediate challenges will be how it would deal with international justice issues.

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22 November 2004 by -

In January 2004, Uganda\'s President Museveni requested the International Criminal Court (ICC) to investigate the situation in the north of the country, which is in the grip of the rebel group Lord\'s Resistance Army (LRA). But it appears that since then he has been doing everything in his power to render the request null and void. On 16 November, Amnesty International expressed concern over a new suggestion by Kampala to judge the crimes committed by a traditional method of reconciliation.

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25 April 2005 by -

In an official photograph taken in The Hague on 16 April, the International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecutor is surrounded by 24 community leaders from northern Uganda who had come to ask him to suspend his investigations in their country. The balance of power was clear. "As soon as there is a solution to end the violence, and if the prosecution is not serving the interest of justice, then my duty is to stop the investigation and prosecution," Luis Moreno Ocampo told AFP after the meeting.

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15 December 2010 by Leiuh Asuman Wakida and Priscilla Nadunga

Almost seven years after Uganda gave the names of the top Lord’s Resistance Army commanders to the International Criminal Court, the country remains divided as to which path should be taken towards justice. Some Ugandan public figures are again calling for the formation of a truth and reconciliation body.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

While in New York on 6 October, William Swing, head of the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), announced at a press conference that arrest warrants had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against five leaders of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a rebel group in Northern Uganda. A week before, the American diplomat had already told the Security Council about the arrest warrants in closed session. His notes were leaked to a Reuters reporter, who was first to spread the news. After months of preparing the first round of arrest warrants, ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo had to watch silently while others spoke out and vented opinions about still sealed documents. In terms of a communication strategy, it was a remarkable fiasco.

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13 June 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army [LRA, the rebel movement in northern Uganda], and another LRA chief would be the object of the first arrest warrants issued by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court [ICC], the French daily Le Monde revealed on 10 June. For the last two months, the silence surrounding the maturation of the Uganda file has generated much speculation over the strategies being pursued.

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