Louise Arbour

article
19 January 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Richard Goldstone, Louise Arbour and Carla Del Ponte served as prosecutors for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The two tribunals shared a prosecutor until 2003. Frederiek de Vlaming completed her dissertation at the University of Amsterdam, analysing how the three prosecutors selected their suspects, focusing mainly on the ICTY.

article
04 December 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 17, over eight years after he began an investigation into the April 6, 1994 attack that cost the life of Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and triggered the genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda, French judge Jean-Louis Bruguière requested that arrest warrants be issued against nine high-ranking officers in Rwanda's current military, including the chief of staff and the head of the army. He would also like to see the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) prosecute the current Head of State, Paul Kagame, who is protected in France by presidential immunity. However, the ICTR will likely do nothing.

article
06 November 2006 by Pierre Hazan

France's attitude towards international criminal justice is marked by ambiguity. Paris subscribes to a vision of the world in which international humanitarian law is considered a way to curb violence against civilian populations, but at the same time it is wary of an unchecked judicial system that could end up prosecuting French soldiers engaged in areas where it has old and deep-rooted interests.

article
16 April 2007 by Thierry Cruvellier

Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan army, will be tried starting April 19 before a court of Rwanda's former colonial power. For the Belgian justice system, this third universal jurisdiction trial for crimes committed in Rwanda in 1994 is the result of twelve years of efforts to try one of those it holds responsible for the murder of ten Belgian UN soldiers on April 7, 1994. For the accused, it is above all the end of a long drawn-out legal process.