Laurent Munyakazi

article
23 May 2005 by Mary Kimani

Since trials began at the gacaca courts on 10 March, over 600 verdicts have been delivered. This is an impressive result, but one that has not been achieved easily. Attendance is proving a constant problem. For a hearing to be valid, the courts require a quorum of at least nine judges and a hundred members of the community. The UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) has also signalled a new problem: thousands of Rwandans have started fleeing to neighbouring countries to avoid standing trial.

article
24 October 2005 by Louis-Martin Rugendo

Officially begun on March 10, 2005, Rwanda's community-based gacaca courts are facing major difficulties and ambiguities. Expectations for the gacaca are divergent, to say the least, and the main challenges for these courts include: lack of resources, political interference, lack of qualified judges and the complexity of the cases being tried. Six months later, only 10% of the gacaca have begun trials and Rwandans are testing the impact of these courts.