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27 April 2011 by David Jan Godfroid

It’s not that the Croats didn’t expect the ICTY to convict Generals Ante Gotovina and Mladen Markac. They knew very well that operation Storm in 1995 was a violent military operation, in which Serbian civilians weren’t spared. Justly so, according to most of them, because a couple of years earlier the Serbs had expelled most Croats from the Krajina region.

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19 July 2004 by -

On 16 July, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia indicted Goran Hadzic, the ex-president of the self-proclaimed Serbian Republic of Krajina, on charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes for persecution and murder as well as wanton extermination, expulsion and destruction committed by Serb forces. Hadzic, a Croatian Serb, is accused most notably of involvement in the massacre of 264 Croats and non Serbs who were taking refuge at the Vukovar hospital (east Croatia) in November 1991.

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05 April 2004 by -

Five military and political leaders are expected to appear at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on 5 April. Indicted on 31 March, the five are accused of war crimes committed against Muslims during the Bosnian war. Two of them, General Milijov Petkovic and retired general Slobodan Praljak, were former commanders of the Croat army in Bosnia-Herzegovina (HVO) during the war. General Milijov was immediately dismissed from his post as chief inspector of the Croat army after news of the charges became public.

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06 September 2006 by -

On 1 September the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia sentenced Radislav Brjdanin, the former leader of the autonomous Serb region of Krajina in North-West Bosnia, to 32 years\' imprisonment for war crimes and crimes against humanity, but acquitted him of genocide. Brjdanin, 56, was accused of leading a campaign of ethnic cleansing against Croats and Bosnian Muslims. Although also acquitted of extermination, Brdjanin was found guilty of aiding and abetting persecutions against Muslims and Croat civilians of Bosnia.

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14 March 2005 by -

On 9 March, General Momcilo Perisic pleaded not guilty to the 13 counts against him before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Formerly Chief of Staff of the Yugoslav army, Perisic is the highest-ranking military commander to appear before the court, responsible only to the president of the Yugoslav Federation and the Supreme Defence Council. He is accused of giving logistical support to the armies of Republika Srpska and Serbian Krajina, which contributed to operations in which atrocities were committed.

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17 March 2008 by -

Operation Storm lasted only a few days in August 1995. The aftermath, however, lasted weeks and resulted in the exodus of about 200,000 Serbs from the border region of Krajina. Prosecutor Alan Tieger laid out the case against Croatian General Ante Gotovina in his opening statement before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on March 11. Gotovina, considered a hero by many Croatians for having re-conquered this part of the country taken by the Serbs at the beginning of the war in 1991, is standing trial together with Generals Ivan Cermak and Mladen Markac.

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