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19 April 2004 by -

The first trial at the special Serbian war crimes court is due to re-open on 27 April amid calls for its abolition and protests over Serbia's lack of cooperation. The trial of six suspected war criminals is a test case for Belgrade, who hopes to be able to transfer more cases from the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTR) to its own courts. The six Serbs, who all pleaded not guilty, face charges of taking part in the massacre of 192 civilians and soldiers in Ovcara, Croatia, at the end of 1991. The trial opened on 9 March and was adjourned two days later.

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04 October 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

The sensitive issue of cooperation between Serbia and the ICTY is on the agenda in a meeting on 4 October between the prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Carla del Ponte and Serbian president Boris Tadic, accompanied by his prime minister Vojislav Kostunika. Del Ponte's arrival in Belgrade on 1 October coincides with mounting pressure from the international community for Serbia to do more in its power to hand over war criminals, including the ICTY's most wanted fugitive, Ratko Mladic.

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13 June 2005 by -

When prosecutor Geoffrey Nice screened a shock video on 1 June at the trial of Slobodan Milosevic before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), he set in motion a domino effect. The video shows six members of a paramilitary commando known as "the Scorpions", which the prosecution claims was working for the Serbian secret service, execute six young people in cold blood in July 1995 in Srebrenica.

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07 February 2005 by -

One of the ICTY\'s most wanted suspects, Vladimir Lazarevic, who gave himself up to the Court on 28 January, is due to make his first appearance before the judges on 7 February. The former commander of the Pristina corps of the Yugoslav Army is wanted for war crimes committed during the Kosovo war (1998-1999). His decision to hand himself in, which was taken in conjunction with the Serb Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica, is the first sign from Belgrade of cooperation with the international tribunal.

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20 October 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Truth commissions have gained steady ground as a mechanism to deal with past atrocities. In 2009 alone, five commissions were set up. Geneva-based expert Priscilla Hayner studied over 40 truth commissions established since the 1970s to record the 'unspeakable truths' about human rights abuses.

Kostunica