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27 March 2006 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

The transfer of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, head of the Union of Congolese Patriots (UPC) to The Hague on March 17 stirred up questions about the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) investigations into the support given to the Congolese militia in Ituri (Democratic Republic of Congo). Thus far, the ICC has targeted only the leaders of the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group and not a single officer of the Ugandan army in its investigations into Uganda. However, the court may be setting its sights on several high-ranking Ugandan officers in the Ituri case.

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16 June 2010 by David Rupiny

The biggest achievement at the two-week International Criminal Court review conference in Kampala, which ended last weekend, was the consensual agreement on the crime of aggression.

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09 December 2009 by Michael Kaloki

On a visit to Nairobi this week, former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan welcomed the Kenyan government’s assurance that it will cooperate fully with the International Criminal Court (ICC) on establishing the best way to secure justice for victims of the 2007 post-election violence.

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14 October 2009 by Lynn Maalouf

Six months after the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) opened its doors, a drastically changed political and security environment in Lebanon, coupled with trim concrete output from The Hague, are driving even some of the tribunal’s staunchest advocates to adopt an increasingly cautious stance towards the court. This is visible in both dampened expectations and increasing questions as to whether the very mechanism will prove to be the best model for trying a crime of terrorism.

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30 September 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

For the last two months, former Liberian president Charles Taylor has been testifying in his own defence before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). But despite an initial flurry of coverage, the public gallery and pressroom have been virtually empty for most of that time. As the court heads for a three-week recess starting October 5th, the IJT takes a look at the defence strategy thus far.

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10 October 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

The dual mechanism to establish crimes and responsibilities in Burundi will take longer to put into place than first announced. IJT has learnt that on 30 September, Kofi Annan will not be submitting his report to the UN Security Council on the creation of the special chamber to try those responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity, and in parallel, a truth commission. [see IJT-23]. It is now widely accepted that more time is needed to consult the nation and its leadership in the light of the recent political upheavals in Burundi.

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10 October 2005 by Anne-Laure Porée

Five months after the entry into force of the accord between the United Nations and the Cambodian government, there has been little sign of progress in setting up the extraordinary chambers to try former Khmer Rouge leaders. Michelle Lee, who was appointed by the secretary-general to coordinate legal assistance on 25 August, is still not in post. Kofi Annan is not set to assign international judges until the end of October. A growing number of observers are openly pessimistic about holding the trials 25 years after the fall of the Pol Pot regime.

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07 February 2005 by Franck Petit

Uganda and Côte d'Ivoire : the ICC prosecutor puts his cards on the table, but debate continues in the UN Security Council over Darfur.

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06 September 2010 by Koert Lindijer

Many Kenyans were disgusted when Omar al Bashir turned up for a party in Kenya last month to celebrate the country’s new constitution. They were dismayed when authorities failed to arrest the Sudanese president even though the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for his detention. His controversial visit raises the question of whether the Kenyan government, despite signing up to the ICC, is genuine about wanting to cooperate.

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