Khmer Rouge

article
Witness appears before the ECCC in case 002/02 against on 13 January 2016 (Photo: Flickr/ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng)
10 February 2016 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Judges at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) continued this month hearing eyewitness testimony about how the Khmer Rouge targeted Cham Muslims and ethnic Vietnamese, including women and children. Case 002/02, part two of the case against former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan [IJT-176, IJT-179], tackles the question of whether the regime committed genocide as per the narrow legal definition.

article
24 September 2007 by Anne-Laure Porée

The eighty-one-year-old former right hand man of Khmer Rouge number one Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, was arrested in Pailin at dawn on September 19 and taken by helicopter to the Cambodian capital. He was brought before the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), which are tasked with trying the most important Khmer Rouge leaders who ruled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. Nuon Chea is charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes.

article
Victor Koppe, defence attorney for Nuon Chea (front row, right) at the ECCC in January 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ECCC/Peter Ford)
07 April 2015 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

At the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), case 002/02 against former Khmer Rouge leaders Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan is in full swing [IJT-168]. Defence lawyer Victor Koppe, who represents Nuon Chea, spoke to IJT, noting, among other things, that bias against the accused has been unmatched. 

article
Political signage of Cambodia’s ruling party, in April 2014, in Siem Reap, Cambodia (Photo: Flickr/shankaronline)
06 April 2015 by Julia Wallace, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Since its inception, the Khmer Rouge tribunal has contended with political pressure, but Cambodia’s changing political landscape is yielding a fierce new crop of opposition.

article
Skulls in the Choeung Ek memorial of people murdered during the Khmer Rouge regime led by Pol Pot from 1975-1979 (Photo: Flickr/sctatepdx)
11 March 2015 by Julia Wallace, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

After over five years of investigation fraught with infighting, government interference and legal drama, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) has charged two more Khmer Rouge officials with a slew of crimes. They include murder, enslavement, extermination and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention.

article
American journalist Elizabeth Becker testifies as an expert witness in Case 002/02 at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (Photo: ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng/Flickr/krtribunal)
23 February 2015 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

When former Washington Post correspondent Elizabeth Becker testified as an expert witness this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (ECCC), she described a surreal visit to Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge regime where “every move was controlled” and everything staged for foreign journalists' benefit.

article
19 July 2004 by Christine Chaumeau

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

issue
14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

article
People wait in line to see the opening statements of Case 002 at the ECCC on 23 November 2011. Copyright Flickr/krtribunal
13 January 2015 by Julia Wallace and Kuch Naren, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

Chum Mey and Bou Meng spend a large part of the day, every day, sitting across from each other. The two elderly Cambodian men are among only a handful who survived a stint in the hellish S-21 prison, where over 12,000 people were jailed, tortured and sent to their deaths in a killing field outside Phnom Penh.

issue
30 November 1999

Who believes in a Phnom Penh trial?

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

Widow calls France to account for Boun-Hor death

Will light ever be shed on events leading to the disappearance in April 1975 of the former president of the Cambodian national assembly Ung Boun-Hor, who was forced to leave his refuge at the French Embassy in Khmer Rouge-occupied Phnom Penh?

Memories of Iraq in Kuwait and Iran

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

Kibuye, a "successful" legal saga

In the space of a week, just before the summer recess, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down one life sentence, confirmed a second and heard the parties debate two other appeal verdicts. The four cases all concern Rwandan personalities prosecuted for crimes committed in 1994 in the same region, eastern Kibuye.

Pages