katanga

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25 November 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The International Criminal Court (ICC) opened its second trial in The Hague this week. On the stand are the Congolese former militiamen Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui who are accused of orchestrating the massacre of about 200 civilians in the village of Bogoro, in the Ituri province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). 

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05 July 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

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06 December 2004 by David Lewis

Back from his visit to this isolated town in the south-eastern province of Katanga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Colonel Mbombo Nzadi seems satisfied. He considers that "it was essential for us to speak to the people on the ground and better understand the circumstances" and therefore that the visit by the tribunal "has helped".

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22 January 2007 by Emilia Richard

The Kilwa massacre trial, which opened December 12 before the Lubumbashi military high court, resumed on January 18. The Kilwa massacres were committed in Katanga by the Congolese armed forces (FARDC) in October 2004. Congolese military authorities are charging Colonel Ademar Ilunga with war crimes, along with eight FARDC members, and for the first time, three foreign nationals employed by the Canadian mining company Anvil Mining - Pierre Mercier, Peter Van Niekerk and Cedric Kirsten - are charged with complicity.

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22 October 2007 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Arrested by Congolese authorities in February 2005, former militia leader Germain Katanga, alias Simba ("lion" in Swahili), was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on October 18. The International Criminal Court (ICC) accuses him of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed during the February 23, 2003 attack on the Bogoro village in Ituri, eastern Congo. After more than three years of investigation, the ICC now has only two suspects in custody: Katanga and former militia leader Thomas Lubanga, who was transferred from Kinshasa to The Hague on March 17, 2006.

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18 February 2008 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

"It is the first time that a free ex-militia leader in Ituri has been handed over to the International Criminal Court (ICC)", said the Office of the Prosecutor after Mathieu Ngudjolo was arrested on February 6 in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Ngudjolo, the former head of the Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI), led a Lendu militia opposed to Thomas Lubanga's primarily Hema Union of Congolese Patriots. Lubanga and Germain Katanga, commander of the Congolese Patriotic Resistance Forces (FRPI) which was allied with the FNI, were already in custody in the DRC before being transferred to The Hague.