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13 January 2010 by -

Hutu extremists shot down the plane carrying former Rwandan president Juvenal Habyarimana in 1994, says the Rwandan government. An official report issued on Monday found that members of Habyarimana’s inner-circle planned his murder in order to scuttle a power-sharing deal with former rebel leader Paul Kagame. The assassination was then used as a pretext for the genocide.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

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10 March 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Sixteen years after the assassination of former Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana, his widow Agathe Kanziga Habyarimana is facing seven counts of genocide and the possibility of being extradited to Rwanda. She was arrested on March 2nd in the Parisian suburb of Courcouronnes, where she had been living for the last twelve years.

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30 March 2011 by Franck Petit

“We want the people responsible for the genocide found and punished”, declared French President Nicolas Sarkozy on 25 February 2010 in Kigali, Rwanda. The stakes were high. The visit marked the resumption of diplomatic relations between France and Rwanda, three years after allegations against President Paul Kagamé by the French inquiry into the 1994 attack on the then Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana. The visit was also the first by a French head of state since the genocide.

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11 November 2009 by Thierry Cruvellier

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) sentenced a former close associate of the Habyarimana regime to eight years in prison last week, after he pleaded guilty to complicity in genocide. 

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07 November 2005 by our correspondent in Arusha

Leading ICTR defendant Colonel Théoneste Bagosora began giving testimony on October 24 for the period leading up to the fateful date of April 6, 1994 - the day the Rwandan genocide began. The former directeur de cabinet in the Defense Ministry denied responsibility for disseminating a "definition of the Tutsi enemy" within the army in 1992. He especially denied being the colonel of the "apocalypse."

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18 June 2007 by Benoît Francès

"Was there a genocide? You'd have to ask a specialist. I'm a military man; it's too much to ask of me." Bernard Ntuyahaga, a former major in the Rwandan Armed Forces (FAR), sometimes gave irritated half answers in response to questions from the judges of the Court of Assises in Brussels. In the troubled hours following the attack on President Juvénal Habyarimana's plane on the evening of April 6, 1994, this G4 army officer (logistics) seemed a stranger to the events. "A ghost in Kigali," quipped presiding judge Karin Gérard.

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16 April 2007 by Franck Petit

An expert on the three days following the April 6, 1994 attack on the plane of President Juvénal Habyarimana in Kigali, Filip Reyntjens has already testified before the Tanzanian judges "to prevent Bernard Ntuyahaga from being extradited to Rwanda." He will be cited by the prosecution as an expert witness in the trial that is opening in Brussels.

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04 December 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

On November 17, over eight years after he began an investigation into the April 6, 1994 attack that cost the life of Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and triggered the genocide of Tutsis in Rwanda, French judge Jean-Louis Bruguière requested that arrest warrants be issued against nine high-ranking officers in Rwanda's current military, including the chief of staff and the head of the army. He would also like to see the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) prosecute the current Head of State, Paul Kagame, who is protected in France by presidential immunity. However, the ICTR will likely do nothing.

Juvenal Habyarimana