article
20 July 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

The Appeals Court in The Hague on 7 July sentenced Joseph Mpambara to life imprisonment for war crimes committed during the genocide in Rwanda. 

article
24 March 2010 by -

A Dutch investigating judge, two court registrars, a representative of the prosecution and a defence lawyer have been in Kigali since March 15th, hearing testimony from 30 witnesses in the appeals case of convicted torturer Joseph Mpambara.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

A district court in The Hague last year sentenced Mpambara to 20 years imprisonment for torture committed during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. He immediately lodged an appeal.

article
30 March 2011 by -

Dear reader, please find the latest IJT. The next issue will be published April 13th 2011.

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In this week's issue:

article
30 March 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

It is winter, four years after the Rwandan genocide. Joseph Mpambara arrives at Schiphol airport, carrying a false Ugandan passport. He tells Dutch Immigration officials that he fled his village Mugonero in 1994. He says he feared for his life as Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) rebels massacred Hutus. Later, Mpambara feared persecution because he had testified in defence of his brother at the ICTR.

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30 June 2010 by -

Dutch police arrested a 63 year-old woman last week on suspicion of involvement in the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Yvonne Ntacyobatabara is said to have led a group of young men in the mass murder of Tutsis and moderate Hutus in the Gikondo locality near the Rwandan capital Kigali.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

A former member of the extremist Coalition for the Defence of the Republic, she moved to the Netherlands in 1998 and obtained Dutch citizenship in 2004. She was later sentenced in absentia to life imprisonment by a local gacaca court in Gikondo.

article
19 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On December 3, the district court of The Hague will hear, on appeal, the request of trial for genocide in the Netherlands of Rwandan Joseph Mpambara, which is supported by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) but at the request of a Dutch prosecutor. In the first instance, the court at The Hague decided, on July 24, that was no basis in national law for a genocide prosecution. The case is a sensitive one for the ICTR, which is working to transfer its cases to national jurisdictions besides Rwanda as part of its completion strategy.

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25 September 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down three decisions in two weeks. Two of the defendants, a former mayor and a former minister, were acquitted. The third, a former officer, was found guilty of genocide and sentenced to 25 years in prison. However these verdicts are not nearly as striking as the new clear and firm tone some of the judges have adopted.

joseph mpambara