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12 October 2011 by Bram Posthumus

Time is nearly up for the world’s first ever Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Human Rights Watch has published a report about his period in office, entitled “Unfinished Business”. International Justice Tribune talked with its author, Liz Evenson.

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26 October 2011 by Mark Kersten

The decision to deploy 100 US troops to Uganda in order to contribute to efforts in the “hunt for Joseph Kony” has been, by and large, positively received

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LRA child memorial (Photo: Flickr/Josh Zakary)
21 February 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

Uganda's decision to support the transfer of Dominic Ongwen [IJT-174] to the International Criminal Court (ICC), instead of trying the notorious Lord's Resistance Army commander at home, casts a shadow on the county's ability to hold domestic war crimes trials.

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24 October 2011 by -

Ugandan NGOs are calling for a major effort to fight impunity in Uganda, by setting up a special domestic court to bring the perpetrators to justice. The Ugandan government put its trust in the international community when it referred the situation in northern Uganda to the International Criminal Court in 2003. But NGOs claim a domestic as well as an international solution is needed to deal with the large number of suspects.

By Josephine Uwineza in The Hague

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24 March 2010 by Hélène Michaud

Former Ugandan Minister for Pacification Betty Bigome is one of the main negotiators between the government of Uganda and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebels in the north of the country. She first met LRA leader Joseph Kony in 1994 and then again a decade later. She told the IJT about her encounters with one of Africa’s most brutal warlords.

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11 July 2011 by -

Uganda on Monday opened its first war crimes trial against a commander of the Lord's Resistance Army rebels accused of brutal civilian killings during a 20-year war in the north of the country.

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15 December 2010 by Leiuh Asuman Wakida and Priscilla Nadunga

Almost seven years after Uganda gave the names of the top Lord’s Resistance Army commanders to the International Criminal Court, the country remains divided as to which path should be taken towards justice. Some Ugandan public figures are again calling for the formation of a truth and reconciliation body.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

While in New York on 6 October, William Swing, head of the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), announced at a press conference that arrest warrants had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against five leaders of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a rebel group in Northern Uganda. A week before, the American diplomat had already told the Security Council about the arrest warrants in closed session. His notes were leaked to a Reuters reporter, who was first to spread the news. After months of preparing the first round of arrest warrants, ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo had to watch silently while others spoke out and vented opinions about still sealed documents. In terms of a communication strategy, it was a remarkable fiasco.

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13 June 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army [LRA, the rebel movement in northern Uganda], and another LRA chief would be the object of the first arrest warrants issued by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court [ICC], the French daily Le Monde revealed on 10 June. For the last two months, the silence surrounding the maturation of the Uganda file has generated much speculation over the strategies being pursued.

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16 June 2010 by Robin van Wechem

Mirjam Blaak, Uganda’s deputy head of mission to Brussels and lead person to the International Criminal Court (ICC), hosted the Review Conference of the Rome Statute in Kampala that ended last Friday.

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